• Parcel vs Freight: What Works Best for You?

    10/22/2019 — Jen Deming

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    The differences between parcel shipping and less-than-truckload (LTL) freight shipping can be difficult to identify, at least on the surface. If you're not using either service regularly, it can be challenging to know which shipping option you really need. But, there are some definite factors that make a difference to a shipper's experience, like transit times, pricing structure, and security risk. Knowing more about the key differences of parcel vs freight shipping can help determine which makes the most sense for your shipment.

    Risk and security

    Packaging and handling practices can vary between parcel vs freight shipping, affecting your freight's risk of damage. Typically, parcel shipments are smaller, individually boxed shipments that move separately within the carrier system. Most are under 70 lbs., but they are accepted up to 150 lbs. Freight loads are larger and most often consist of multiple boxes or items collected onto a pallet, or within strapped-together crates, and ship together as a group. Both types of shipments have packaging requirements that include protective material inside the container to help prevent damage. Because freight shipments often use shrink wrap or other binding material to keep boxes together, loss is minimized. 

    Because of their smaller size, parcel shipments can be easily handled and are generally auto-sorted through the carrier conveyor system. They are then taken to a regional location and transferred through multiple stops and service terminals until final delivery. Because of all the handling, combined with the smaller size of loose parcels, there is an increased risk for lost or misrouted boxes. Freight shipping also includes loading and transfer at multiple stops, but it's less frequent than parcel services. Fewer stops means less loading, but because the pallets may need to be moved with a forklift, there is a risk of damage associated with handling that shippers must keep in mind.

    Driver service level

    A key point to keep in mind when considering parcel vs freight shipping is the truck driver's level of involvement when it comes to handling the shipment. Parcel shipments moved by common carriers such as FedEx or UPS are loaded, unloaded, and delivered by hand. A shipper is responsible for proper packaging and labeling, and a receiver must check the shipment carton count and for damages. But generally, a driver will take care of handling, including front door pick-up or inside delivery. 

    Freight shipping is an entirely different story. The driver only moves your freight from pick-up to destination; it is up to the shipper and consignee to have a team ready for the loading and unloading of the freight. This means the driver will not assist. Driver assistance can be requested, but because it is considered a special service, expect to pay extra. Additionally, accessorials such as inside delivery or limited access locations may incur other fees on top of regular shipping charges. 

    Pricing and cost efficiency

    One of the most significant differences in parcel vs freight shipping relates to how pricing is calculated. Freight pricing is determined by several variables, including distance traveled, fuel cost, weight, additional services, and the classification of the shipment. Lane pricing is set by carriers and certain routes across the country can be more competitively priced than others depending on the volume of industry or location type. For example, shipping off-mainland or to a densely congested city's downtown area can be pricey. Depending on your product type, or the density of your shipment, the freight class can either increase or decrease. Lastly, carriers tend to have different levels of liability coverage, depending on freight class, in the event of damage claims on a shipment. Freight class is an extremely important factor for freight shippers as it pertains to cost.

    Parcel pricing can also be complicated. The shape, weight, and size of a package all affect the cost, in addition to the type of service requested. Shorter, expedited transit times cost more than standard ground shipping options. Additionally, dimensional (DIM) weight pricing has become popular with common carriers. Dimensional weight bases price on the package volume in relation to its actual weight. The practice was implemented in an effort to minimize awkwardly-sized shipments that waste space in a carrier's truck. It's important to properly calculate your dimensional weight so that you can accurately predict the cost of your shipment.

    Knowing the differences of parcel vs freight shipping can help you make the right choice in service and save you in shipping costs. If you're shipping larger, heavier items, or can combine multiple shipments into a single load, using an LTL freight service is right for you. If you're shipping smaller, single boxes and want faster door to door service, parcel shipping is the better option.

    Understanding how pricing is calculated for both, and what you can expect your shipment to encounter during transit, will help you ship smarter. If you're still unsure which would make the most sense for your business, call 800-599-2902 or contact us today.

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  • Freight Shipping Documents 101

    10/09/2019 — Leah Palnik

    If you're new to freight shipping, there are a few documents you will come across frequently that you may be wondering what they are, why they are used, and what the differences of each are. For instance, what's the difference between a freight bill and a bill of lading; what do BOL and POD stand for; and what is a weighing-and-inspection report? Knowing these documents and their purpose can help avoid misunderstandings that might undermine an otherwise mutually beneficial business relationship between you and your third party logistics provider, carriers, suppliers, or even customers.

    What is a Bill of Lading?

    The bill of lading, or BOL as it is often called, is a required document to move a freight shipment. The BOL works as a receipt of freight services, a contract between a freight carrier and shipper, and a document of title. The bill of lading is a legally binding document providing the driver and the carrier all the details needed to process the freight shipment and invoice it correctly. The BOL also serves as a receipt for the goods shipped. Without a copy signed by the carrier, the shipper would have little or no proof of carrier liability in the event the shipment was lost or destroyed.

    When you schedule a shipment through PartnerShip, the BOL is automatically generated based on the shipment details entered during the quoting and shipment creations process. You are welcome to use our BOL or you can use your own if your order system already generates one. Either way, the BOL should be provided to the carrier on pickup and will be delivered to the consignee on delivery.

    When composing a BOL, it is important to provide weight, value, and description of every item to be shipped. The BOL spells out where the freight will be collected, where it will be transported, and any special instructions on when and how the freight should arrive. Traditionally, the BOL also serves as title to the goods thus described; in other words, it can serve as an official description of loan collateral.

    What is a Freight Bill?                                        

    Freight bills, or freight invoices, are different from bills of lading in that they do not serve as a key piece of evidence in any dispute. The freight bill is the invoice for all freight charges associated with a shipment. While freight bills should match up closely to their BOL counterparts, they can also include additional charges (such as accessorials), information, or stipulations that serve to clarify the information on the BOL. When you are looking for an invoice to examine as part of a shipping analysis, you will generally use the freight bill rather than the original BOL since it will have the freight cost information on it.

    In effect, freight bills are similar to other invoices for professional services your business might collect. Although they may seem less important during the freight shipping process, they should be retained long term. Because PartnerShip both automatically audits every one of our customers' freight bills, we have been able to avoid many cases where human error or carrier mistakes would have led to erroneous charges on your freight bill. PartnerShip customers can easily access copies of their freight invoices online at PartnerShip.com.

    What is a Proof-of-Delivery?

    A proof of delivery, or POD, is a document that is used when a shipment is delivered. The consignee signs this document to confirm delivery. Some carriers will have the consignee sign the BOL as confirmation of delivery. In other cases, carriers will use their own delivery receipt (DR), or even a copy of the freight bill. The consignee, when accepting delivery of the goods, should note any visible loss or damage on the delivery receipt (or whatever is used as the POD). It is your right as the freight shipper to request a copy of the POD at any time.  

    What is a Weighing and Inspection Report?

    A weighing and inspection report, or W&I report, is a document you may encounter less frequently. The W&I report comes into play as part of a carrier's process to inspect the freight characteristics of a shipment to determine that it accurately matches the description that is on the BOL. If the actual shipment weight is different than the weight that is shown on the BOL, then a W&I report is completed noting the change.

    When a customer receives a freight bill with charges greater than what was originally quoted, often times this is due to this sort of weight discrepancy.  The customer has the right to request a copy of the W&I report from the carrier if needed to confirm the reweigh was performed and is valid. 

    What is a Cargo Claims Form?

    A cargo claims form, or simply claims form, is a document that carriers will require a customer to complete if there is any sort of shortage, loss, or damage "claim" with a shipment. A claim is a demand in writing for a specific amount of money that contains sufficient information to identify the shipment received by the originating carrier, delivering carrier, or carrier in which the alleged loss, damage, or delay occurred within the time limits specified in the BOL.

    Claims should be filed promptly once loss or damage is discovered. Time limit for filing a claim is 9 months from date of delivery, or in the event of non-delivery, 9 months after a reasonable time for delivery has elapsed. If a claim is not received by the carrier within this time, payment is barred by law. A claim may be filed by the shipper, consignee, or the owner of the goods. Be certain to clearly show the name and complete address of the claimant. If you need help filing a claim with a carrier, feel free to contact PartnerShip and we'll help you through the process to ensure your best interests are protected. Claims forms are available online at PartnerShip.com for most of our freight carriers.

    PartnerShip is here to help

    As always, your friends at PartnerShip stand ready to help our customers every step of the way through the shipping process. We know you have a business to run – that's why you can count on PartnerShip to help you get the best shipping rates, the best carriers, and the best service for your LTL freight and truckload shipping needs. If you need access to any blank forms or documents for shipping, such as a bill of lading, cross-border documents, or carrier claims forms, be sure to check out our shipping forms on PartnerShip.com

    Want to become a pro at filling out your BOL so you don't encounter any costly errors? We have just the thing you need. Download our free guide!

    BOL Breakdown: Download the White Paper



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  • Manufacturing Day 2019 is Friday, October 4th!

    10/01/2019 — Jerry Spelic

    PartnerShip Celebrates 2019 MFG Day

    PartnerShip is proud to support and celebrate MFG Day 2019!

    The first Friday in October, MFG Day was created to show the reality of modern manufacturing and celebrate the large role manufacturing plays in the US economy. Thousands of companies and educational institutions across the country open their doors to students, parents, teachers and community leaders to connect with America’s future creators to create an interest in a career in manufacturing.

    PartnerShip is proud to work with many organizations that support and promote manufacturing, such as NTMA, MAPP, PMPA, Manufacturing Works, and many more.

    Today’s manufacturing jobs are high-skill and high-tech, but there is still a skilled labor shortage in the manufacturing sector. MFG Day is an opportunity for people, especially students, to learn what modern manufacturing really looks like and to discover that manufacturing offers high-quality and high-paying jobs and career choices. Consider these statistics:


    Last year, 275,000 people attended more than 3,000 MFG Day events.

    PartnerShip helps hundreds of manufacturers ship smarter and we’re proud to spread the word about the importance of manufacturing. If you’re a manufacturer that wants to work with a shipping partner that understands your business, contact PartnerShip for a quote on your next shipment!

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  • The 8 Best Ways to Avoid Freight Detention Charges

    09/30/2019 — Jen Deming

    The 8 Best Ways to Avoid Freight Detention Fees Blog Post

    Detention charges are the single most common accessorial fee that shippers see when they receive a final bill following a truckload haul. The typical industry standard for unloading/loading times is two hours, and anything after that will incur a fee. Two hours can seem like plenty of time, but the truth is that time can slip by much too quickly if you, your shipment, and your loading team aren't completely prepared. The end result often includes costly fees and a higher freight bill. The good news is that with the right plan in place, detention charges can be avoidable. These eight simple tips help to proactively offset going over that time and help keep your budget in check.

    Have an experienced team ready

    First and foremost, in order to avoid detention charges, it's important for shippers to have an experienced team ready and familiar with the process of loading and unloading a truck. Have a detailed plan in place, make sure the product is ready and packed the way you need, and stage the shipment in the order which you want to load. If you have a multi-drop load, be sure the items you need to be delivered first are loaded closest to the doors. If you happen to be the customer, or delivery location, make sure your dock space is cleared out, and the unloading team is prepped and waiting at the time delivery is anticipated.

    Extend warehouse/dock hours

    One of the toughest parts of freight transit that a truck driver struggles to anticipate is unforeseen hold-ups, including pick-up delays, traffic, or weather conditions. Many times, simply being stuck in rush hour can make a driver late, and while it's not the shipper's responsibility to accommodate the delay, there may be benefits in doing so. By extending your warehouse hours beyond what is typical, it gives an already pressured driver more flexibility. By doing that, you ensure a full team is at the ready while also strengthening your carrier relationships.

    Open a back-up dock

    Once a driver arrives for the load, assuming it is within the negotiated window, the countdown begins. It doesn't matter if the warehouse lot is congested, the dock you need is being held up, or the team is busy with another shipment. Once the driver has parked his truck, your two hours are dwindling away and you're inching closer to detention fees. It's important to keep a back-up plan ready, a second dock location, and a few extra hands at the ready, so that if any unexpected delays occur, you can get going at your regularly planned start time. 

    Aim to be a "shipper of choice"

    In the current freight market, it's no secret that the carrier holds the cards, so smart shippers should do everything they can to be desirable to available drivers. Factors like warehouse hours, streamlined loading and unloading, prepared paperwork, and available parking space all help the driver, especially in an industry where wasted time means wasted money. By being flexible and making the pick-up and delivery process as easy as possible for the truckload carrier, shippers can reap the benefits of a strong relationship. A driver may be more willing to look past minimal amounts of detention time if your business is easy to work with and keeps operations flowing smoothly.

    Negotiate extra time beforehand

    Some shipments may be extra difficult to handle and therefore take extra time to load. Good examples of these types of shipments include over-sized or wide-loads or those delivering to limited access areas. Though industry standard is typically two hours, if you have a strong relationship with a regular carrier, and you anticipate needing extra time, it doesn't hurt to approach the possibility of free, or discounted, extra load time when negotiating the initial rate with the carrier. A truck driver is much more likely to be flexible if they anticipate being held up, rather being delayed the day of and likely set back in their transit time.

    Check your loading equipment

    You'd be surprised how many times a shipment is held up at a location just because the proper loading equipment is not available or in working order upon carrier arrival. Because it's rare for a truckload carrier to have a liftgate, it's important for both shipping locations to have proper loading equipment on hand such as a forklift.  If you are moving a larger piece of freight, such as a machinery load, and need cranes or other nonstandard pieces of equipment to load, these must be accessible and operable by certified team members. Additionally, all parties involved have to do their homework and be familiar with circumstances at either location. If a shipper arranges a delivery to a customer without a dock, you can bet that team will be scrambling to unload on time if they aren't prepared. That means detention charges are likely. 

    Get your paperwork in place

    Every shipper knows that freight shipping involves a lot of paperwork. Minimally, a shipper needs to have a bill-of-lading prepared at pick-up, and additional documents can include product invoices, customs paperwork, insurance certificates, hazmat documents, among many others. If you are moving freight across the border, there are a myriad of other pieces of information a carrier and border officials will need as well. Having these items prepared for the driver upon arrival will help get your shipment loaded, and the driver back on the road, within the allotted loading time.

    Consider drop-trailer programs

    For shippers who are moving freight regularly to and from consistent locations, a drop-trailer program is an efficient and expedient option. In this type of freight haul, a carrier brings a loaded trailer to a location, unhooks and "drops" the trailer, and picks up a pre-loaded trailer that's been packed with freight. This cuts down on time waiting for loading and unloading, and gets the driver back on the road at a much faster rate. Drop-trailer programs are becoming increasingly popular, especially with new hours of service rules issued by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Association that affect the amount of time a truck driver can be on duty. Using a drop-trailer program not only guarantees better efficiency and convenience for the driver, it also streamlines a shipper's supply chain operations.

    Unexpected fees tacked on to a freight bill are never a welcome surprise. While detention charges are very common, truckload shippers have options to avoid detention and spending more money than anticipated. Simple measures during preparation and packaging and being extra flexible with your truck driver can help offset any potential hold-ups while also strengthening your working relationships with regular carriers. The truckload shipping experts at PartnerShip can help simplify your shipping procedures with reliable carriers and customized service options. Call 800-599-2902 to learn more or contact us today.

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  • UPS and FedEx Peak Surcharges Announced for 2019

    09/24/2019 — Jerry Spelic

    2019 UPS and FedEx Peak Surcharges

    UPS and FedEx have both announced that they will not apply peak season surcharges on residential deliveries this holiday shipping season. However, both companies will continue peak surcharges on large shipments and those requiring additional handling during the holidays.

    During the 2018 holiday season, UPS applied a per package residential peak delivery surcharge of $0.28 for ground and $0.99 for air shipments. This year, the company is leveraging its expanded air and ground capacity, and automated sorting hubs and processing facilities, to pass cost savings on to customers in the form of no residential delivery peak surcharge. More than 75% of UPS's small package volume will pass through these automated facilities in peak 2019.

    “We delivered a record-setting 2018 peak season in terms of both on-time delivery performance and operations execution,” said David Abney, UPS Chairman and CEO. “We will build on the lessons learned last year and leverage our new efficient air and ground capacity to make the 2019 peak season another success for customers, investors and other stakeholders.”

    This is the third holiday season FedEx has not added additional peak surcharges on residential deliveries. With UPS and FedEx both not applying a residential delivery surcharge this year, it is great news for e-commerce retailers and online shoppers. Online sales are expected to grow 14% to 18% this holiday season, and in the past, these residential delivery surcharges were passed along to shoppers in the form of higher shipping costs.

    It’s important to remember that both UPS and FedEx are implementing peak surcharges this holiday season on larger packages and those that require additional handling.

    UPS peak surcharges will apply to larger packages from October 1 through January 4:

    • $31.45 per package for shipments that qualify as large (a 20% increase from 2018)
    • $250.00 per package for shipments that qualify as over maximum limits (a 51.5% increase)

    UPS will apply peak surcharges for additional handling from November 24 through January 4:

    • $3.60 per package for shipments that require additional handling (a 14% increase)
    FedEx peak surcharges will apply to larger packages from October 21 through January 5:

    • $37.60 per package for shipments that qualify as oversize (a 36.7% increase from 2018)
    • $435.00 per package for shipments that qualify as unauthorized (a 190% increase)
    FedEx will apply peak surcharges for larger packages from November 18 through January 5:

    • $4.10 per package for shipments that requires additional handling (a 13.8% increase)

    The growth of e-commerce and online shopping for large and awkwardly shaped products such as mattresses and furniture has necessitated these surcharges because heavy and bulky packages can’t move through the automated systems in which UPS and FedEx have heavily invested. Through these surcharges, shippers are paying the price for the loss of efficiency these packages represent.

    If you’re a retailer, you should pay close attention to this year’s UPS and FedEx peak season surcharges so you can make any needed changes now to help ensure you remain profitable during the busy holiday shipping (and shopping) season. A good first step would be to look at the large packages you ship and determine which will be impacted by the peak surcharges.

    The UPS and FedEx additional handling peak surcharge will be triggered by packages that:
    • Weigh more than 70 pounds
    • Measure more than 48 inches along its longest side and more than 30 inches along its second-longest side
    • Are not enclosed in traditional corrugated cardboard packaging

    UPS Large Package and FedEx Oversize Package surcharges will be triggered by any package that exceeds 96 inches in length or 130 inches in length and girth.

    UPS Over Maximum Limit and FedEx Unauthorized Package surcharges will be triggered by any package that exceeds 150 lbs., 165 inches in length and girth combined, or longer than 108 inches.

    Surcharges for these packages are already high; additional UPS and FedEx peak surcharges represent an added dent to your bottom line. When deciding how to ship your small package shipments, or if you should use LTL to ship your oversized or heavy packages, you need an expert on your side. PartnerShip manages shipping programs for over 140 associations, providing exclusive discounts on small package shipments to their members. To find out if you qualify or to learn how you can ship smarter, contact us today.


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  • PartnerShip Appreciates America's Truck Drivers!

    09/09/2019 — Jerry Spelic

    2019 Truck Driver Driver Appreciation Week

    This week has been designated National Truck Driver Appreciation Week and PartnerShip says “thank you” to all of the men and women who keep America moving forward by transporting freight safely, reliably and efficiently. 

    “Every September, trucking comes together to recognize what we consider the most important profession in the country: truck drivers.” said American Trucking Associations (ATA) President and CEO Chris Spear. ATA Executive Vice President of Industry Affairs Elisabeth Barna added, “It’s a chance for the industry to work with the general public, policymakers and members of the media to acknowledge truck drivers for their dedication to safety and professionalism.

    National Truck Driver Appreciation Week happens September 9 - 15 to honor all 3.5 million professional truck drivers for their hard work and commitment. PartnerShip is saying “thank you” with a Dunkin' Donuts gift card for drivers that move a load for us during the week. It’s our small way of thanking drivers that help our customers ship smarter.

    To learn more about National Truck Driver Appreciation Week and the American Trucking Associations, visit the ATA website. To become a partner carrier, contact one of our Carrier Procurement Representatives for a setup packet at carriers@PartnerShip.com or visit our Becoming a PartnerShip Carrier webpage. Then check the PartnerShip Load Board and get started!

    Become a PartnerShip Carrier


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  • The Top 5 Best Inbound Shipping Resources

    08/22/2019 — Leah Palnik

    The Top 5 Best Inbound Shipping Resources

    When you think about how to optimize your shipping operations, the freight you receive from vendors might not be the first thing that comes to mind. However, you have more control over your inbound shipping than you may realize, and when you have the right resources it can actually be easy to master. We’ve rounded up some of our top resources that will help you manage your inbound shipments.

    1. Understand the difference between “prepaid” and “collect”. Inbound management 101 starts with looking at how you’re paying for your freight. A common misconception is thinking that you’re not paying for your inbound shipping when you’re not paying for it. This video will help you gain a good understanding of prepaid and collect, and how you can make a switch that will help you save in the long run.
    2. Learn how to properly accept freight and handle claims. You probably already know that sometimes the freight you receive can arrive damaged. It’s obviously never ideal, but that doesn’t mean it has to be a total disaster. Having the proper procedures in place with your warehouse staff is the key to getting claims approved and paid out when the unthinkable happens. Find out the best steps to take with this helpful white paper.
    3. Learn how to create and use routing instructions. Creating routing instructions for your vendors is a great way to ensure your inbound freight gets shipped at the best price and in the most efficient way for your business operations. Getting started is the hardest part, but we have you covered. With this blog post we show you some examples, explain how to create your routings, and give guidance on how to communicate them to your vendors.
    4. Achieve vendor compliance. You’ve perfected your routing instructions and you know exactly how to cut your costs. The only thing that’s missing? Getting your vendors to follow your lead. This blog post gives you a few pro tips to get those relationships on track.
    5. Follow the 4 steps to gain control of your inbound shipping. When you’re ready to take a full look at your inbound shipping operations, you’ll want to check out this all-encompassing white paper. It’ll guide you through the four important steps you’ll need to take to cut your costs and help everything run smoothly. Find out exactly what you need to do and get tips for executing them.

    Figuring out how to effectively manage your inbound shipping doesn’t have to be intimidating. These resources can point you in the right direction, but you don’t have to do everything by yourself. PartnerShip is here to help you implement these important strategies and save you time in the process. We can set you up with discounted pricing, create your routing instructions, and help ensure vendor compliance. Contact us to learn more.

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  • Machinery Transportation: How to Get the Best Rate

    08/08/2019 — Jen Deming

    Machinery Transportation: How to Get the Best RateMachinery transportation is a tricky endeavor that often presents shippers with a unique set of challenges outside of what is “normal” for a standard freight haul. Because larger, heavy machinery may need specific requirements in order to ensure safe transit, it’s important for shippers to be able to determine the proper equipment for the task. Being able to sort out which equipment type works best for your load can also keep costs where they need to be, so that you’re not overspending on a specialized piece of equipment you don’t really need.

    Why trucking equipment matters for your machinery transportation

    The variety of heavy hauling equipment used in machinery transportation can vary greatly depending on size, maximum weight capacity, structural components, and materials. Certain types of heavy haul equipment work exclusively with pickup and delivery locations that have docks. Others are built to be flexible in order to fit a variety of different loading and unloading needs for places with limited options like construction sites. It’s important for shippers to keep in mind that the more specialized the piece of equipment, the more time needs to be built into quoting and finding an available truck. It’s also likely that the haul may be more costly. Determining certain factors about the machinery you are planning to ship can help you choose which piece of specialized equipment may make sense the most sense for your load.

    Types of equipment to consider for your machinery transportation:

    1. Best for the budget-minded but flexible: Flatbeds/extendable flatbeds
      Flatbeds are some of the most common types of trailers used in truckload shipping and are extremely versatile for a wide variety of haul types, especially for machinery transport. They have a maximum weight limit of 48,000 lbs. Dimensionally, the maximum width and height for legal operation is 8.5 feet. A shipment can be wider, or stacked higher, but over dimensional rules and restrictions will apply. 

      A major drawback to the standard flatbed is that it is typically raised 60 inches off the ground. This means that either a forklift or a crane will need to be used to load and unload freight. So, if your equipment can be broken down and disassembled for transport, this is your least expensive and most readily-available option. 

      It’s important to keep in mind that flatbeds are open air trailers. This means your load will be exposed to the elements. Depending on the type of machinery you are moving, tarps and straps may be needed for protection. Most flatbed drivers do have these items available, but it’s critical to note that at the time of your request. 

      Another type of flatbed option is an extendable deck. This type of equipment is essentially a flatbed trailer that can be expanded to carry longer shipments. The most common size is a 48 foot flatbed that is expandable to 60 feet. If you are shipping a piece of machinery that is extra-long or in multiple pieces, this would be a great option for your load.


    2. Best for extra tall loads: Step deck
      A step deck trailer is very similar to a standard flatbed, but the addition of a tiered upper and lower deck creates two levels in order to accommodate for taller cargo. The shorter upper deck is typically 11 feet in length and can fit 8.5 feet in height. The longer lower deck is 37 feet in length and can accommodate up to 10 feet in height. It’s important to note width requirements are the same as a standard flatbed. If you are shipping a piece of equipment over 9 feet in height, it would make sense to look at a step deck trailer option. These types of trailers often have ramps for unloading, and may be safer for forklift pickup since they are closer to the ground.

    3. Best for loads that need security and versatility: Conestoga
      This trailer option combines the security benefits of a standard three-sided dry van trailer with the versatility of a flatbed trailer’s loading and unloading options. Drivers can side load with cranes or forklifts the same way they would with a flatbed, but don’t need to struggle with tarps and straps for protection from the weather and elements during transit. Another added benefit to the Conestoga retractable tarp system is individual access to any part of a load during transit, making multiple drops easier should your shipment need delivery at multiple locations. These trailers also come in a step deck version which are useful for especially tall pieces of equipment. Conestoga trailers aren’t necessarily a standard part of every fleet, so they can be difficult to find and the price may reflect that depending on spot rate trends.

    4. Best for extra tall, over dimensional loads: Lowboy/Double drop trailer
      As one of the most common trailer types for construction equipment loads, lowboy trailers are especially suited for machinery transport. They can haul from 40,000 to 80,000 lbs. depending on the amount of axles on the trailer. These trailers have a maximum 12 foot freight height and overall load height of 14 feet, making them particularly useful for very large equipment. If the load is over dimensional, it’s important to note that they may require additional permits depending on sizes of the load and state regulations within the transit.

    5. Best for very large, drive-on equipment: RGN (Removable Gooseneck Trailer)
      A removable gooseneck trailer is the most convenient option for machinery transportation, especially for the large pieces of equipment such as cranes, excavators, or other large pieces of construction equipment. The front of the trailer detaches, allowing it to be lowered to ground level to create a ramp. This means loads can be driven onto the trailer, either by operating the machinery itself or via forklifts moving smaller pieces of equipment. Maximum freight weight is 42,000 lbs. but can be up to 80,000 lbs. depending on the number of additional axles. Maximum freight height is 11.6 feet and width is the standard 8.5 feet, but there are “stretch” options too for longer loads. If either the pickup or delivery location need to drive equipment on, this is the option for you. But, because this is the ultimate specialized piece of equipment that offers the greatest flexibility, it’s most likely to be the least cost-effective option.

    Machinery transportation can be a complicated process, so it’s very important for shippers to be informed in order to get the best rate. Variables such as height, width, and length of your load all impact what trailer type you need. Available options to the loading and unloading team, such as loading dock height and forklift assistance, all impact whether you need a simple flatbed, or a more sophisticated piece of equipment such as an RGN. If you have a truckload shipment and need assistance to find a reliable carrier with a specialty trailer, contact PartnerShip or get a free quote!

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  • Vendor Prepaid versus Inbound Collect Shipping

    07/24/2019 — Leah Palnik

    One of the simplest and easiest ways to immediately cut your inbound freight costs is to change your shipping terms from "prepaid and add" to "collect." Having your vendor or supplier ship collect on your recommended carrier eliminates any handling charges, thus saving you money.

    When you gain more control over your inbound shipping, you can save on small package and freight shipments coming into your business every day. As the buyer and receiver of the goods, you can and should designate the carrier and arrange for shipping charges to be billed directly to you at your discounted rate. This is called routing shipments inbound "collect." Collect is a billing option, in which you are invoiced by the carrier. It does not mean paying the driver at the time of delivery.

    In general, there are many benefits to having your inbound shipments routed collect. First, it usually saves a lot of money. But even if you don't have as aggressive freight deals as your vendor, their handling markup could be a lot higher than your freight deal.

    Shipping inbound collect also reduces the number of carriers from different suppliers arriving at your receiving dock every day. When you control the routings, you control how many trucks deliver to your door. That also makes it easier to maximize your staff's efforts.

    There may be some cases where your supplier's prepaid freight can actually benefit you. First, some suppliers do not add any fees for handling, and freight is just a pass-through. In this instance, you may want to continue having your supplier pay the freight to save some time and money. But if you are trying to consolidate the number of trucks at your dock, and increase the control you have over inbound shipping, it might still be worth routing by your carrier, even if it will cost you more.

    Another example of where inbound prepaid may continue to make sense is if your supplier has poor packaging. If you have a supplier that ships a high-value product with suspect packaging, you may want them to prepay and add the freight. Even if they are charging a premium for freight, you do not want to deal with the hassle if that shows up at your door damaged. You will be much better off refusing it and letting your supplier deal with the claims process if there are any damage issues.

    Conclusion

    Taking control of your inbound shipping may take a little work, but the final payoff is reducing your overall inbound freight spend. If you're ready to take control of your inbound shipping and you're not sure where to start, PartnerShip has the process, tools, and experience to help.

    • We can provide a complete, inbound freight analysis to help you determine where you can save additional money on your inbound shipping
    • We provide simple inbound supplier/vendor management forms making it easy to choose which vendors you use most frequently
    • We create updated routing requests and shipping instructions and then we contact your vendors on your behalf
    • We maintain great relationships with the common suppliers in the industry to gain routing compliance
    • We can provide inbound shipment visibility reports so you know exactly what was shipped to you and by whom
    • We consolidate and audit all of your inbound freight bills so you can enjoy the simplicity of a single invoice 

    Contact PartnerShip today and take control of your inbound shipping!


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  • Why Shippers Should Care About the CVSA Roadcheck

    06/03/2019 — Leah Palnik

    Why shippers should care about the CVSA roadcheck

    Coming to a highway near you, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) International Roadcheck will take place June 4-6. On average, 17 trucks will be inspected every minute in Canada, the United States, and Mexico during the 72-hour period. The CVSA-certified inspectors will primarily conduct the North American Standard Level 1 Inspection and could render trucks out of service or place drivers out of service for violations. In fact, nearly 12,000 trucks and buses were placed out of service last year.

    Both the drivers and their vehicles are put through a 37-step inspection which includes checking items such as the braking system, securement of cargo, exhaust system, frame, fuel system, lights, tires, wheels and rims, and other critical components. Each year, the CVSA places special emphasis on a specific category of violations. This year’s focus will be on steering and suspension systems due to their importance to highway safety.

    Drivers and their trucks are subject to these same inspections year-round, but the International Roadcheck event brings a significant increase in inspections that has a notable ripple effect.

    What can shippers expect?

    • Capacity will tighten which will likely increase freight rates. Many smaller carriers and owner operators will take the days off to avoid the potential hassle. This can make it more difficult for shippers to find trucks during this time – driving up the load-to-truck ratio and therefore driving up rates.
    • Delivery times will be affected. Not only do all of these inspections take time, but some loads may be delayed if drivers are pulled out of service due to violations. Even something as simple as a cracked windshield could cause a vehicle to be pulled out of service. In general, it’s a good idea to allow for some extra time just to be on the safe side.

    Finding a truck during Roadcheck week is easier when you’re working with a quality freight broker like PartnerShip. We’ll help you find the best option and let you know what you can expect. Get a free quote today!

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  • 3 Times You Should Consider Regional Freight Carriers

    05/14/2019 — Jen Deming

    3 Times You Should Consider a Regional Carrier

    Most shippers are familiar with the large network of national freight carriers commonly seen on the road, but regional freight carriers tend to be a little less recognizable. While larger freight carrier organizations have many benefits, including a sizable service area and the resources to have a large pool of available trucks, many shippers are not aware of the lesser-known benefits associated with using smaller local or regional carriers. In order to make smart shipping decisions, it's important for shippers to weigh the advantages of working with different types of carriers. Consider whether they may make sense for you, so that you're getting a service that best accommodates your business. 

    When using a regional freight carrier makes sense: if you don't need to ship far to reach your customers

    In terms of size, regional freight carriers operate in a smaller, more concentrated geographic territory than national carriers. Typically, the trucks are traveling 500 miles or less, though there are several companies that service larger areas or specific lanes. These carriers territories tend to fall into one of two categories: multi-state lanes or local transportation that operates within a certain city lines or borders. Examples of regional freight carriers include PITT OHIO, Dayton Freight, and AAA Cooper

    If your business is shipping mostly to local customers that are located within state, or even in the same general geographic area of the U.S. (Southwest, Great Lakes, Northeast, etc.), you may want to consider using a regional carrier. Because these carriers aren't servicing larger cross-country lanes, they tend to have shorter hauls since they are delivering locally. This may limit where you can ship to, but keep in mind that there are still larger, national carriers at your disposal. There are many benefits to shorter hauls, as well. Typically, these hauls do not undergo as much loading and unloading at carrier terminals like longer hauls do. This can mean less damage and more on-time deliveries for your freight, ultimately getting you happy customers and better business. Smaller companies can sometimes spend more time focusing on continuing safety and service training. For example, Dayton Freight, a top regional freight carrier, dedicates time and energy pursuing the continued education of its team. In-house programs like "Dayton Freight Academy" to focus on improving and supplementing the skills of drivers and other employees when it comes to safety, truck maintenance, and freight handling. This intentional focus on service at the employee level helps regional freight carriers like Dayton improve the customer experience. 

    Also because regional freight carriers specialize in a smaller geographic area, drivers may have greater familiarity with the region in general. They may be much more knowledgeable about things only locals drivers may know, like which complicated delivery addresses are located where, whether they are likely to be classified as a business or residential location, what time of day traffic is most congested, or other route obstacles to avoid. This can help avoid potential pick up and delivery challenges or other issues that may delay a shipment.

    When using a regional freight carrier makes sense: if service level is of utmost importance

    There are many service benefits in working with regional freight carriers. Due to their smaller size, they can often offer a more personalized class of service that puts a greater emphasis on the customer experience. Because these carriers are working with a smaller customer pool, they often can offer better flexibility and responsiveness when issues come up with a shipment. Many regional freight carriers have smaller corporate offices in local areas which may mean live, reachable customer service teams versus automated service lines. That way, shippers can have more direct contact with local terminals rather than being given the run around by calling a general customer help line. All in all, this may lead to better management of a shipment from pick up to delivery for some shippers who value a high level of customer service. 

    When using a regional freight carrier makes sense: if you need to be particularly mindful of your freight spend

    Using a regional freight carrier can lower your freight costs, especially if your business needs specialized services, such as liftgates or other accessorials. It's relatively common that regional carriers do not have to pay delivery area surcharges and have fewer accessorial costs and lower minimums than national freight carriers, which means they can pass on these savings through lower prices to shippers. Another benefit associated with working a smaller service area? Next-day or expedited delivery is more reasonable. For example, PITT OHIO, a regional carrier based in the Midwest, offers some of the most expanded next-day lanes in the nation. A small service area means a shorter haul, quicker transit time, and less work overall for the carrier to hasten delivery. Because of that, these expedited shipping costs can be lower than with national carriers.

    Finally, because regional freight carriers are also typically smaller organizations, shippers may have more negotiating power when it comes to discounted rates or lowered accessorial fees. Regional carriers are likely to be more flexible in order to compete with the huge volume of business that national carriers naturally pull from the market. 

    For some shippers' needs, bigger isn't always better. There are very specific instances when a business may benefit from utilizing a smaller regional or local carrier network over a national carrier company. The first thing to consider is whether your customer base is located in a targeted geographic area. If you're doing business with local customers, and factors like price, service level, and timeliness are important, a regional freight carrier may streamline your shipping procedures. To learn more about the benefits of using a regional carrier, and whether they are right for you, call 800-599-2902 or get a free quote today.  

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  • Cross-Border Freight Shipping FAQs

    04/16/2019 — Jen Deming

    Cross Border Shipping Blog

    Shipping to and from Canada can be intimidating for even the most experienced shippers. The good news is that cross-border shipping isn't as hard as you may think it is. Below are some frequently asked questions that we've compiled for your reference when you're gearing up to ship freight cross-border.

    What is PARS?

    The vast majority of LTL freight and truckload shipments to Canada clear at the border under a process referred to as the Pre-Arrival Review System (PARS). PARS allows review with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) in advance of the freight's arrival. The PARS process speeds up customs clearance and alleviates congestion at the border, but in order for this system to work, every party involved (customs broker, importer, and carrier) need to play their part. 

    What is a PARS number?          

    The PARS number is commonly referenced when setting up PARS clearance and is also commonly referred to as the Cargo Control Number (CCN). The PARS number for all shipments will be the tracking number preceded by the carrier's four digit carrier code. In order to avoid being delayed at the border, a carrier must inform the customs broker of the port of crossing, the ETA, and carrier contact information. 

    Can my shipment be PARS accepted and still be bonded or inspected at the border?

    Yes. Even though the shipment information has been sent via PARS and accepted by CBSA, Canada customs agents have the right to inspect a shipment.

    What is PAPS?

    The Pre-Arrival Processing System (PAPS) is the United States equivalent of PARS. PAPS allows customs paperwork for individual shipments to be processed before southbound freight reaches the Canada/U.S. border - facilitating the freight's entry into the U.S.

    Where will my shipment cross the border?

    Different carriers use different Canada/U.S. Custom gateway locations. Where your specific shipment crosses will depend on its origin and destination. Generally, carriers will list their gateway locations on their website and PartnerShip will use the most direct route for your shipment to meet your delivery expectations.

    How long can I expect the transit time to be on cross-border shipments?

    While there are occasional delays at the border, mostly caused by volume of traffic, transit times are rarely affected due to border crossings. So, based on the mileage, you can generally expect similar transit times as you would in the U.S. (i.e., <500 miles = 1-2 days, >500 miles = 2-3 days, >1,000 miles = 3-4 days, etc.)

    What forms and documentation will I need for my cross-border shipment?

    Getting your shipment across the border requires a bit more paperwork than what's required for standard domestic shipping. Luckily, PartnerShip has compiled a list of documents you'll need when shipping from the U.S. to Canada. Those forms can be accessed on PartnerShip.com by logging in and visiting PartnerShip.com/ShippingForms.

    What is ACI?

    Advance Commercial Information (ACI) is a project of the CBSA. ACI requires that all commercial cargo entering Canada be electronically registered with the Agency prior to arrival at the border. The project's aim is to improve Canada border security and efficiency.

    What is ACE?

    ACE is a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) program that gives CBP and other participating government agencies the ability to access data throughout the international supply chain to anticipate, identify, track and intercept high-risk shipments at borders and ports. With ACE, carriers are able to file electronic manifests in advance of freight arrival at the customs check point for faster entry into the commerce of the U.S.

    What is a FAST certification?

    A Free and Secure Trade (FAST) certification is an expedited clearance program between the U.S. and Canada for commercial vehicles. It's intended to ensure safety and security for commercial carriers who meet eligibility criteria and have passed background checks. Benefits of the program include dedicated lanes for quicker border clearance, as well as simplified clearance procedures. Certified carriers can travel through checkpoints as required documents are verified, but trade-related verification can be completed later. 

    How much do I pay shipping cross-border?

    As with shipping in the U.S., your actual freight charges will depend on many different variables, such as: commodity, weight, fuel, etc.

    The importer of record is normally billed by his/her broker for duties and taxes. The customs broker determines duty (if applicable) along with the appropriate taxes and reports those taxes to Customs on the client's behalf.

    Where can I get help to work out the details when shipping between the United States and Canada?

    The shipping experts at PartnerShip are familiar with the ins-and-outs of cross-border shipping and can help manage the details that leave you bewildered. From paperwork to policies, we make sure you are feeling confident about your cross-border moves so that you can rest easy that your shipment is traveling securely. To learn more about cross-border shipping, call 800-599-2902 or get a quote today.

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  • Asset vs. Non-Asset Based 3PL: The Major Distinctions

    04/03/2019 — Leah Palnik

    Asset Based vs. Non-Asset Based 3PL: the Major Distinctions

    There are two main types of third-party logistics (3PL) providers and they’re not exactly created equal. Asset based 3PLs and non-asset based 3PLs each have their place in the market. However, they have a few key differences that can impact how your freight is handled and how much it will cost you.

    What are asset based 3PLs and non-asset based 3PLs?
    Asset based logistics providers own some or all of the parts of the supply chain. This can include carriers, trucks, warehouses, or distribution centers. Conversely, non-asset based 3PLs don’t own these parts of the supply chain. Instead they are relationship-based and develop a network of partners to help move your freight.

    The major differences between asset based and non-asset based logistics
    Besides how they operate, there are some distinctions that are important for shippers to take note of.

    1. Flexibility and ability to offer custom solutions
      Since asset based 3PLs have their own carriers, those are the carriers they will rely on to move your freight. Their carriers likely specialize in specific lanes or services or may only have a presence in one part of the country. If those specializations match up with your specific needs, it could be a great partnership. However, if they don’t or if your needs vary, you likely won’t be receiving the most efficient or cost-effective service.

      On the other hand, non-asset based logistics providers have a wider network. They have access to multiple carriers which allows them to source the one that most closely aligns with your needs. That flexibility allows them to offer more customized solutions for your freight.

    2. Level of control over the supply chain
      Asset based 3PLs have more control over the supply chain because they own the assets that comprise it. What that results in is the ability to set their own pricing more easily because they don’t have to negotiate with an outside party. Asset based 3PLs also have more direct control over carrier issues and errors. They can implement changes with their carriers that non-asset based 3PLs simply can’t.

      Non-asset based 3PLs have less control, especially when it comes to what the carrier does. That’s because there are more hands involved with moving your freight. However, a quality broker will know what to look for to prevent issues and will have high standards for the carriers it keeps in its network.

    3. The underlying interests of the 3PL 
      It’s hard to argue that asset based 3PLs aren’t inherently biased. They own their own warehouses and trucks, so it’s obviously in their best interest to have shippers use them over others.

      The interests of a non-asset based 3PL are more in line with the shipper than the carrier. The best brokers will work on your behalf to find discrepancies in your invoices, provide claims assistance, and use their expertise to help you ship more efficiently.

    How to decide between an asset based 3PL and a non-asset based 3PL
    The type of 3PL that is best for you will largely depend on your specific needs. In general, you want to make sure you are working with a broker that can get you access to capacity when you need it most. From there, you should evaluate the typical characteristics of your freight so you can find a 3PL that is closely aligned.

    No matter the situation, you need to work with a quality broker that is dedicated to finding you the freight solutions you need. PartnerShip is a non-asset based 3PL with an extensive network of alliances designed to help you ship smarter. Contact us to learn how you can save on your freight and improve your operations.

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  • 6 Considerations for Choosing an LTL Freight Carrier

    03/13/2019 — Leah Palnik

    6 Considerations for Choosing an LTL Carrier

    The 25 largest U.S. less-than-truckload (LTL) carriers collectively brought in $34 billion in revenue in 2017. That is a staggering number and a 7.8% increase over the previous year. When the numbers are in for 2018, don’t be surprised to see another healthy rise. As the largest LTL carriers continue to command more of the overall marketplace, shippers must be resourceful when looking to source LTL freight services so as to not get squeezed on price due to the number of market players. Shippers should take the following six factors into consideration when finding the most efficient LTL freight services.

    1. Transit Times - How fast do you need to get your shipment to your customer, or to receive your shipment from your vendor? Long-haul carriers tend to have slower transit times in regional lanes, while regional and multi-regional carriers are much faster in these lanes, but may not provide service in longer haul lanes.
    2. Geographic Coverage - Once you get beyond the top 10 LTL carriers, most of the remaining players provide only regionalized direct pickup and delivery services. Understanding carrier coverage areas helps you optimize which carriers are best suited for the service.
    3. Service Performance - On time pickup and delivery performance is not always the same. Often this depends on where your business is located relative to the nearest freight terminals. Long-haul carriers traditionally have been known to provide lower delivery reliability, while regional carriers tend to provide reliability in a higher range. Almost all of the LTL carriers will guarantee delivery or provide deliveries that are "faster than standard" for additional fees.
    4. Liability Coverage - The amount of liability coverage you receive can vary and is set by the carrier. It’s not uncommon to see liability restricted to $0.25 per lb. or less, which means shippers need to be diligent about understanding their options. Especially if the liability coverage doesn’t meet the actual value of the freight.  
    5. Financial Stability - Most of the remaining LTL carriers in the industry are pretty stable from a financial standpoint. However, there are a few carriers that continue to struggle with profitability and debt issues. Anyone who may recall when industry behemoth Consolidated Freightways closed its doors in 2002 will understand the importance of not having your freight in the hands of a financially unstable carrier. 
    6. Pricing Factors - Lastly, and perhaps most importantly for many small business, is price. When working with an LTL freight carrier, there are many factors that will determine your true cost of transportation. These include:
      • Discounts, base rates, and net price 
        Most LTL carriers provide pricing in the form of discounts off of base rates, which will vary by carrier. So, a 68% discount from one carrier might actually be less expensive than a 70% discount from another. The main point to consider when comparing LTL carriers is not what the discount or the base rates are, but rather what is the final net price to you.

      • Minimum charge  
        Generally a flat fee under which the carrier will not discount its price. Some carriers offer big discounts, but set the minimum charge high which may result in less of a discount on smaller weighted shipments than you anticipated.

      • Freight classification 
        There are 18 different freight classes ranging from 50 to 500. These classes are based on the density of your product and will definitely impact your overall price.

      • FAK provisions 
        If negotiated, "freight-all-kinds" provisions may allow you to ship products with different classes under a single class from a pricing standpoint. 

      • Weight 
        How much your shipment weighs will play a significant role in how your rate is calculated. Keep in mind that carriers will use hundredweight pricing, which means that the more your shipment weighs, the less you'll pay per hundred pounds.

      • Accessorial fees 
        Extra services performed by the carrier generally add additional fees to your overall freight bill. The fees that carriers charge for these services can often be radically different so it's important to educate yourself. 

    There are other factors not mentioned above that need to be considered when choosing an LTL freight carrier as well, such as equipment specifications (e.g., liftgate, trailer size, etc.), scheduling flexibility, and tracking capabilities, to name a few. It's easy to see why, what may seem like a simple service of picking up a shipment and delivering it, is often more complex than meets the eye.

    Generally speaking, there is almost never just one LTL freight carrier that fits every need you may have. Unless you have spare time on your hands, your best bet is to work with an established freight broker like PartnerShip that can do the heavy lifting for you so that you can stay focused on running your business.

    Need some help evaluating your freight shipping? Need help finding the right LTL freight carriers? Let PartnerShip provide you with a free, no-obligation quote to get you started.

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  • Truck Driving Trailblazers: Women in Shipping

    03/08/2019 — Jen Deming

    Women In TruckingMany of us are familiar with the impact truck shipping has on our day-to-day lives, but few of us are familiar with the women truck drivers who contribute so significantly to the transportation industry. March is Women's History Month and PartnerShip would like to take the opportunity to look at how women have played a part in trucking's past and are currently shaping the future. From the first women who sat behind the wheel, to the movers and shakers changing the shipping industry today, we take a look at the women who help get our stuff where it needs to go.

    Riding West with Annie Neal

    Stagecoach and horse-drawn freight wagons, often hauling bullion and other high-value supplies heading west from the east, were a very early predecessor to the modern trucking industry. A notable husband-wife team, Annie Neal and her husband William often ran routes together, taking turns driving the teams of horses or acting as load security. Annie is often credited with being one of the earliest female "freight haulers" and helped pave the way for women drivers of the future.

    A Shift in Responsibility

    Horse-drawn modes of transportation were being retired through the beginning of the 20th century, and engine-powered trucks evolved as a reliable, efficient mode preferred by most freight carriers. As World War I broke, the first utility trucks were being used to haul medical equipment as well as injured soldiers to and from the battlefront, oftentimes being driven and loaded by women medical attendants and nurses. The onset of the first World War set the tone for a female-dominated industry while men were otherwise occupied and away fighting.

    Luella Bates - Mechanic, Operator, Spokesperson

    The early 1900's also saw the need for women to fill long-haul freight positions left by men who reported for duty. Luella Bates was one of about 150 women hired as test drivers for new truck prototypes by Four Wheel Drive Auto Company. These women tested safety, security, and overall mechanical soundness of these vehicles, logging many hours under various weather conditions and road types. When the men returned, Luella stayed on, acting as a demonstrator, mechanic, and driver, often touring across the United States for truck model launches and safety demos. She was often used in advertisements and as a consultant for dealerships throughout the remainder of her career, and used her public platform to generate excitement and interest among fellow female truck drivers.

    Lillie Drennan - the First Licensed Truck Driver

    Lillie Elizabeth McGee Drennan was another huge force in the history of women truck drivers. After starting a trucking company with her husband William Drennan in 1917, Lillie played a huge part in the training and recruiting of additional drivers. After divorcing in 1929, Lillie took control as sole owner of the trucking company, and also began driving trucks in order to expand and grow the business herself. After an initial denial to receive her own commercial driver's license (CDL), presumably due to a hearing impairment she'd had since she was a child, she successfully won a lawsuit and received the license in 1929. Following that, she continued expanding her successful truck business as a well-known regional owner-operator in East Texas. Lillie became a strong advocate for women's rights and a hero to those living with disabilities. She continued to push for equal opportunities for women in the workplace and helped successfully recruit female drivers during World War II.

    Driving the War Effort

    During World War II, Rusty Dow was a truck driver for the U.S. Army Engineers/Alaska Defense Command. In 1944, she became the first woman to drive a fully loaded truck the entire length of the Alaska Highway, completing the 1,560-mile trip in 11 days. During the same period, Mazie Lanham became the first woman driver for UPS in 1943 due to a workforce shortage during the war. Many other women came to follow in her footsteps, earning the nickname "Brown Betties."

    Starting a Revolution

    In the 1970's, Adriesue "Bitzy" Gomez was a truck driver and a champion of women in the trucking industry. During this formative period in the Women's Movement, she founded the Coalition of Women Truckers, an organization that worked to level the playing field in such a male-dominated industry. Through her efforts, and those of the other 150 members she recruited, Bitzy pushed forward a campaign to hire more female drivers and machinists, fighting for equal opportunity and safety from harassment within the workplace. 

    Where are we now?

    The truck shipping industry has changed a lot over time, and women are entering the field of transportation more readily than before. But, there's still a lot of catch up to do to even out female representation within this male-dominated industry. The Women in Trucking Association is an organization created with the intention to increase the number of women working in trucking transportation. The WIT has partnered with the National Transportation Institute in order to accurately report the number of women in trucking. While women represent the minority group within the industry, and women only comprise 7% of the available pool of drivers, women are working in over 24% of the management and training roles. 

    Where are we headed?

    Women drivers are more in demand than ever, especially with the ongoing driver shortage that continues to affect the available pool of carriers. To recruit and entice qualified truckers, male or female, carriers are optimizing current work conditions by upgrading tech, creating new dedicated rest areas, updating equipment to include more comfortable living accommodations for long hauls, and an increase in base pay. Drivers earn pay based on experience and miles, offering a more level compensation playing field than in many other industries and available career opportunities. While women continue to encounter many of the challenges presented since first breaking into the trucking industry, carriers are making it clear that they're wanted - and needed, not only as drivers, but as trainers, recruiters, brand advocates, mechanics, and business owners.

    Women have been involved in the transportation industry since wheels first hit the road. As time has passed, the role of these women has evolved, and that role continues to change as needs of the industry adjust to meet the needs of consumers. Throughout the transformation, one thing is for certain - women in trucking continue to play an indispensable and revolutionary part in the future of transportation. If you're a driver, we want you to play that part with us - join our network of partner carriers!


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  • Freight Class Explained: FAK FAQs

    02/27/2019 — Jen Deming

    Freight Class 3 Image

    There seems to be an endless number of factors that can affect freight class, and in our last two blog posts, we covered the most significant, including product category, materials, packaging, and density. When we talk freight class with our customers, many shippers ask about a potential or existing FAK (Freight All Kinds) rating, and whether it's getting them the best pricing possible. yes, we're throwing another shipping acronym in the mix. We'll take a look at what it is, which shippers quality, and whether or not it really is right for your business. 

    What is an FAK?

    An FAK is a class agreement that is established between a carrier and a shipper, allowing the shipper to move multiple products of different classes at one standardized freight class. Essentially, an average class of all the commodities being shipped is determined, and the shipment gets rated at the same class regardless of the product type, making the price fair for both the carrier and the shipper.

    How does this differ from a class exception?

    A class exception agreement utilizes an umbrella system that may rate a range of actual class items at a lower class. For example,  a business that may ship items classed at 70-200 may be rated at a class 150. Anything above class 200 would ship actual class. A true FAK is extremely rare for a shipper to negotiate with a carrier, as it requires extremely high volume for carriers to determine it worth their while.

    How does a carrier determine whether an FAK is possible?

    As mentioned above, freight carriers really have a lot of the control and are calling the shots in many parts of the freight industry. A shipper must really be moving a high volume of loads in relatively even amounts in order for lower-classed items to offset higher-classed items, making the compromise worthwhile to the carrier. Originally, when FAK classification agreements were first implemented, they were beneficial to both parties. However, many shippers learned how to manipulate the agreement, shipping risky freight loads at a lower cost, and putting carriers in the hot seat. To combat the misuse of the system, carriers have held back in entering these agreements more now than they used to. 

    If you are a rockstar at optimizing the packaging and maneuverability of your high-class freight, taking into consideration density, fragility, and stowability, you have a better shot at obtaining an FAK. Basically, if you can get your freight to operate like a lower class, you may be rewarded with a lower class.

    What's the catch?

    If anything proves true in freight shipping, it's that nothing is as simple as it seems. An FAK can seem like an awesome idea with a few drawbacks, but even if a shipper does manage to acquire an FAK with a carrier, it doesn't mean it's exclusively beneficial. Keep in mind that carriers are in charge and the parameters in place are pretty much at their discretion. If you are not shipping lots of mixed pallet freight, it just doesn't make sense. Small to medium-sized businesses that have one or two major commodity types won't see the same benefits of an FAK as facilities that are mass producing many types of products would.

    If you are typically shipping lower-classed items, keep in mind that your "average" class could potentially be higher than your actual class, because you are essentially increasing your minimum charge. It may save you on the one-off shipment, but it's hurting you in the long run. The same goes for a class exception strategy. Carriers are not likely to be open to lumping any of your shipments of a higher class into this tier, no matter how infrequent they are. Because of this, your tired structure will likely reflect a higher average class, which is essentially over-classing your shipments. 

    Another notable consequence of FAK implementation is that carriers will often limit liability on these shipments. In many carrier tariffs, verbiage is in place that the carrier is responsible for the price per pound on the freight class being paid. This is very different from actual class. If you are shipping a high value load at a very low class, even if the damage claim is won, the payout would be minimal compared to the value of the shipment. 

    What's my class?

    Now that we've gone over how an FAK can affect freight class, let's take a look at an example shipment that would create a difference for shippers with and without an FAK. We can use a hypothetical where we are a shipper with an FAK agreement in place. If the actual freight class of our shipment falls within 70-200, we are rated at 150.

    In this example we will be looking at a pallet of popped popcorn, in boxes, measuring 40 x 48 x 52 and weighing 315 lbs. This is a common shipment that would typically be rated as density-based, and would have a high class due to the fact its density is low. We will use ClassIT in order to determine the actual class and compare it versus the FAK. 

    With the search tool, we use the keyword "popped popcorn." It's important to note the distinction between popped popcorn and popcorn kernels because popped popcorn is much less dense, and a higher-classed shipment than raw kernels. Our shipment best falls into the Foodstuffs Group, which is a general group of foods, beverages, and other types of non-perishable items that are broken down into many articles usually determined by density:

    Popcorn Blog Image 1

    In this case, we will use the Snack Foods group, which is broken down into many different subgroups:

    Popcorn Blog Image 2

    Once more, we have to figure out density. In this example, our shipment density is 5.75 lbs. per cubic foot. It fits under Sub 4, or class 175. This is a pretty high shipment class, and would result in a high freight rate. In our hypothetical example, our FAK would get this actual class 175 shipment rated at a class 150. Dropping to 150 isn't a huge difference for a final freight rate, but should anything happen to the shipment in transit, it could potentially pay out much less than what the actual class would.

    FAK is just another added layer to the very complicated topic of freight classes. While they may sound like a great alternative to paying actual class, it's pretty clear that with the current state of the freight shipping industry, carriers are dictating the terms for shippers. FAK agreements are rare, and it's likely they aren't the best option available to lower freight cost anyway. The most important thing for shippers to consider isn't an FAK or even a discount percentage - it's what you are paying for your freight. A qualified freight broker can help alleviate the stress of shopping rates, and make sure you are paying for freight at the class that's right for you.

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  • Freight Class Explained: Demystifying Density

    02/20/2019 — Jen Deming

    Freight Class Density Blog Image So, you've been brushing up on freight class and you're starting to get a hang of how it's determined. In the first part of our freight class series, we learned that packaging, commodity type, and dimensional features all influence the final code that ultimately affects your shipping price. Just when you thought you had a handle on the basics, we're going to throw you a little curveball. Some commodities have an added layer of mystery (and math) when it comes to their class: the density of the overall shipment. Let's sharpen some pencils and get down with density-based freight classifications.

    What is density?
    First thing's first, density is a method of measurement that relates the weight of your shipment to its dimensions, or pound per cubic foot. Typically, the higher the density, the lower the classification and vice versa. A good example of a high density shipment would be a pallet of bricks. Lower density shipments, or those that take up lots of space but are lightweight, are items such as ping-pong balls. 

    Why are some shipments density-based and what are they?
    Commodities that are solid, heavy, and take up minimal space are very desirable to pretty much any freight carrier. Using density as a factor in determining freight class and pricing is becoming the new standard, especially as freight demand increases and capacity decreases. Thanks to variables such as a shortage of drivers and strict trucking legislation, carriers are trying to weed out difficult or unprofitable shipments in order to make space for more standardized loads. Time and effort are money in this industry, and carriers are taking control of who they want to ship for

    How do you calculate the density of a shipment?
    Density is calculated by measuring the height, width, and the depth of the shipment, including skids and packaging. This is multiplied to determine cubic inches. If you have multiple pieces, multiply for each piece and add them together. Then, divide the total cubic inches by 1,728, or the total cubic inches in a foot. The result is the total cubic feet of the shipment's pieces. Divide the weight (in lbs.) of the shipment by the total cubic feet. The result is pounds per cubic foot, or density. 

    What is my freight class?
    To help you better understand density-based shipments, we will look at a shipment of steel machinery parts, in a crate measuring 42 x 46 x 42 inches and weighing 500 lbs. By using the search function in ClassIT for "machinery parts", we can see a broad grouping for 114000, or the Machinery Group: 

    machinery ClassIT Example 1

    Through this group, we are directed through sub-articles, where we can find the 133300 group "Machinery or Machines, NOI, or Machinery or Machine Parts, NOI". From there, we can view associated subgroups that refer to density and packaging:

    Machinery ClassIT 2 
    You may also notice the "NOI" designation for this particular breakdown. "NOI" refers to "not otherwise indicated" and was implemented by the NMFTA for commodities that do not easily fit into existing classifications. Using NOI can be risky, since most products do have a specific freight class. Since "NOI" designations tend to draw attention from carrier inspection teams, it's critical that they are used properly, and that means density must be calculated to determine the subgroup.

    In this example, and using the formula listed above, we can determine density using its dimensions and weight.

    1. Multiply the length, width, and height (42 x 46 x42) to get the total cubic inches (81,444).
    2. Divide the total cubic inches by 1,728 to get the total cubic feet (47).
    3. Divide the weight of the shipment (500 lbs.) by the total cubic feet (47). This will give you a density of 10.65.

    Looking at the chart, we see that because of our crated packaging type, the top 4 subgroups are applicable. 10.65 falls under the subgroup 3, or class 92.5. In this class example, it is important that dimensions and weight are accurately measured in order to calculate the true density (and appropriate class) for the shipment. It's also crucial to note once more that packaging makes a huge impact. See how high the classes jump if the product is palletized or in packages other than secure crates or boxes.

    LTL services are in higher demand than ever before. National freight carriers are in the driver's seat, and doing what they can to limit troublesome shipments - including those with a low density and high freight class. Once you've optimized your shipments for carriers, many shippers wonder about whether a Freight All Kinds (FAK) agreement may be a worthwhile perk. Next, we'll take a look at what goes into that FAK and if it's right for your business.  The freight specialists at PartnerShip can guide the way so you aren't stuck staring at your calculator, and a high freight bill. Call 800-599-2902 to speak with a representative, or get a quote today.

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  • Freight Class Explained: Bring on the Basics

    02/13/2019 — Jen Deming

    Freight Class Blog Image 1

    Freight class is a critical component of shipping your LTL loads. But it's confusing and making a guesstimate is risky business. Your shipment's freight class plays a huge part in from everything from your initial freight rate estimate to your payout for any potential damage claims. How can a little number mean so much?

    What is a freight class?

    Prior to understanding class number, shippers need to grasp the importance of the NMFC, or National Motor Freight Classification. Every type of product or commodity has a numeric code assigned to identify it within a categorical system, similar to a UPC used within a grocery store. The code also breaks down these products into over-arching groups, which then tell you how to class your product. There are 18 freight classes that range from 50 to 500. Your freight class helps the carrier determine how much to charge for your shipment, along with other factors such as weight and distance traveled, as well as any additional requested services. Typically, the higher the class, the more expensive the subsequent freight rate.  

    What factors determine a freight class?

    There are four factors that influence the classification of different commodities; each affects the difficulty in transporting the freight and increases the freight class. 

    • Density - The space an item takes up as it relates to weight. The higher the density, the lower the classification. Low density shipments take up a lot of space but weigh less, making the shipment unprofitable to carriers. More classifications are becoming density-based as capacity becomes crunched and larger, less standard types of freight are entering the network to be shipped.
    • Storage/Stowability - This refers to how easily freight can be stored and stacked on the truck, and how much space it takes up. Similar to density, if a shipment is large, oddly-shaped, or difficult to fit in the truck, the load becomes undesirable. .A higher freight class is assigned in order to reflect the added work to fit in the load.
    • Handling - Similar to storage and stowability, the more difficult it is to load and unload a shipment affects freight class. A shipment that requires more creativity and flexibility to load and unload will increase the class.
    • Liability - Carriers assign higher freight classes to "high risk" shipments in order to limit their accountability for those shipments that are more likely to be damaged in transit or have an increased risk for freight theft. If you have high value or fragile products, it will be reflected in a higher freight class to offset that risk.
    What is my freight class?

    To better understand the differences in freight classes, and how they are determined, looking at a few types of our most commonly shipped commodities can be insightful. As an example, we'll take a look at stone materials. While many shipments of stone are transported via truckload carrier, and don't need a classification listed on the shipping paperwork, there are still many instances where quarries, fabricators, and other stone suppliers need to move smaller loads for shorter distances. 

    ClassIT Slate Image 1
    In order to help shippers determine freight class, the National Motor Freight Traffic Association has created an online reference tool, ClassIT. The resource is available to shippers with a membership, and it's the primary tool used by PartnerShip shipping specialists. The index can be searched by using a brief description of the commodity. Being too specific, or too vague, can create issues in your search results. Note you can search by including "any word" or "every word" to adjust your results.

    Let's say we have a shipment of slate blocks which are in 3 creates that are 4 ft. by 4 ft. and 515 lbs. each. We see two groupings that actually fall into the same Item or NMFC number, which is 90280. This is considered the "Gravel or Stone Group; consisting of gravel, sand, slag, slate, or stone, as described in items subject to this grouping." If we select "Slate Blocks, Pieces or Slabs, NOI" we are brought to the following breakdown of articles. You can see how specific it gets regarding packaging, usage, and dimensions. 

    By looking at our shipment of crated slate blocks, we can see that our sample shipment falls under the 90280 Slate Blocks Pieces or Slabs group:

    ClassIT Slate Image 2

    It goes even further than that, breaking down into subgroups which determine freight class depending on packaging and size. This is why it is imperative to know the precise weight and dimensions of your shipment. In our example, our slate blocks are in crates 48 in. long, which falls under the subgroup 4 - class 65. Compare that to crated slate blocks longer than 96 in., which would be class 85. This is an increase, but shouldn't affect pricing drastically. When packaging type is adjusted, however, the class is increased significantly. By palletizing the slate blocks (subgroup 1), freight class jumps to 250. At this weight, the final freight rate can be raised by hundreds of dollars.

    In the Slate Blocks, Pieces or Slabs group, you can also reference three separate notes that are relevant to the details of the shipment:

    ClassIT Slate Image 3

    These details are notable, because it gives further direction on how best to package your freight for both safety and security. In 90282, the note states that "pieces or slabs 2 in. or less in thickness" must be boxed or crated and marked "fragile." We see more packaging direction in 90283 regarding exposed surfaces and edges and requirement for wrapping and other protection. This is to hopefully limit damage, but shippers must also be mindful that if freight falls within this category, and it is not packaged as directed, a damage claim will likely be denied by the carrier. 

    Freight class, in addition to weight and distance traveled, is critical in determining a shipment rate. Specific details relating to product and packaging can greatly affect the NMFC code and final freight class. A shipment of slate blocks may sound simple enough, but things can get a bit more complicated once you start looking at different commodities. Density-based shipments can further befuddle shippers, and understanding these types of classifications is the next type of class breakdown we will tackle. The experts at PartnerShip can lend expertise so you can stop scratching your head. Call 800-599-2902 to speak with a representative, or find your freight class online.

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  • The Best Ways to Become a Shipper of Choice and Why it Matters

    02/06/2019 — Leah Palnik

    The best ways to become a shipper of choice and why it matters

    Carriers have more power than ever, which means it’s increasingly important that shippers find ways to make their load more appealing than the next guy’s. Becoming a “shipper of choice” is a great way to get a leg up and ultimately get better access to capacity and reasonable freight rates.

    How did we get here? The tight capacity freight market
    It's basic economics – the demand for freight services is higher than the current supply of tractor-trailers and drivers. This has been the trend over the past several years, due to a number of factors. For starters, there is a driver shortage. According to ATA’s 2017 Truck Driver Shortage Analysis, the trucking industry was short roughly 36,500 drivers in 2016. The appeal of the open road isn’t what it once was, and not enough qualified drivers are entering the workforce to make up for those who have left or retired.

    On top of that, there has been an increase in regulations that have put some constraints on carriers. Hours of services (HOS) rules dictate that truckers can’t drive more than 11 hours a day in a 14 hour period, and thanks to the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate, enforcement of that rule is harder to get around. As a result there are less trucks available to move your freight. Carriers hold the cards and can be picky about the loads they want and what shippers they’ll work with.

    What is a shipper of choice?
    Becoming a shipper of choice means that your load, your location, and your business practices are in line with what carriers consider desirable. They want to make sure that they’re protecting their bottom line and not losing precious time. This is a status that is achieved by showing carriers respect and committing to a long term strategy that enables best practices.

    Why you should care about becoming a shipper of choice
    Being a shipper of choice will help you secure a truck at a competitive rate when you need it most. It used to be true that having a large volume of freight is what makes a shipper desirable to carriers. While that often doesn’t hurt, it’s not enough anymore. If you have a great deal of freight but constantly create headaches for your drivers, they will likely turn elsewhere for business or charge you more.

    Carriers are becoming savvier when evaluating whether they should work with a shipper or not. Think about how you use apps like Yelp. It’s now incredibly easy to see if a restaurant has bad service or isn’t worth the cost. Truckers have apps like Dock411 that help them easily communicate and access information about load/unload time, parking, security, dock conditions, and more.

    How to become a shipper of choice
    Reaching shipper of choice status is not something that you can do overnight. You need to commit to making long term changes that are advantageous to both you and your carriers. Here are a few ways you can achieve this:

    1. Avoid detention time at all costs.
      The last thing you want is to get a reputation for holding up drivers. To them, time is money and it’s important to show that you respect that. HOS rules and the way drivers’ time is strictly tracked through ELDs means that every minute they’re waiting at your dock is taking away from the time they could be earning on the road.

      According to a survey conducted by DAT, most carriers consider detention a serious problem and the majority of them rank it in the top five challenges facing their business. Making sure you’re able to load or unload within the 2 hour window is a good way to keep your driver happy and be a shipper of choice.

    2. Be flexible with pick-ups and deliveries.
      When you require a strict appointment time, truckers can’t maximize their time on the road. Also, limiting your hours to weekdays forces drivers to travel during the most heavily trafficked times. By opening up options for your carrier, you increase the chances of your load being covered. And when you make this the rule, rather than the exception, you’re more likely to become a shipper of choice.

      In lieu of strict appointments times, you could request pick-up or delivery by a particular day and allow for early arrival. If that doesn’t work for you, you might consider moving from appointment times to a window of time. Being open on off-peak hours and during the weekend also will open up your access to capacity.

    3. Provide parking options.
      Thanks to the HOS rules and ELD mandate, drivers have to be efficient at managing their time. However, as you know, there are a number of factors that can cause them to be tied up including traffic, roadside inspections, and maintenance. If they hit their hours while at your dock, it can be a major risk for them to drive to the next available rest stop.

      Allowing drivers to park at your location or having an option nearby can be a major plus. It also shows that you care about the challenges they’re up against. While this may fall more in the “nice to have” category, having parking available could make the difference when carriers evaluate if they want to cover your load over another shipper’s load.

    4. Make sure your location is safe and easy to access.
      One major component that carriers take into account is ease of access. There’s nothing worse than arriving at a location that doesn’t have sufficient space for a truck to maneuver easily or has hazards that make it difficult to navigate.

      You might not be able to change where you’re located, but shippers of choice will make it a point to eliminate any potential obstacles they can. It’s also important that you provide clear signage that can help direct the driver appropriately when he/she arrives.

    5. Treat your drivers the way you would want to be treated.
      Truck drivers don’t have an easy job, and they spend a tiring amount of time on the road. If you deny them basic amenities like access to a bathroom and a place to stretch their legs while they wait, that is not something they’re likely to forget.

      Showing respect and being kind goes a long way. Greet your drivers and provide an area where they can relax and refresh while being loaded or unloaded. Some shippers are even providing full lounges designed to make drivers as comfortable as possible, with wifi, refreshments, and showers. You can’t be a shipper of choice if you aren’t willing to show a little bit of empathy for your drivers.

    Next steps
    Now that you know what it means to be a shipper of choice, why it matters, and how you can achieve it, the next step is create a plan. Carrier relationships are incredibly important in today’s freight market, and when you make them a priority, you’ll benefit your business in the long run.

    PartnerShip maintains strong alliances with the best carriers in the industry. Our shipping experts can help you find ways to become a shipper of choice, gain access to capacity, and save on your freight rates. Contact us today to find out how you can ship smarter.

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  • ArcBest: Delivering New Shipping Solutions to PartnerShip

    01/23/2019 — Jen Deming

    ArcBest Solutions Blog

    PartnerShip® is always working to expand our available carrier network in order to meet every customer's shipping needs, every time. For those customers who value premium service and an unmatched experience, we are pleased to announce the addition of the ArcBest® network to our comprehensive group of partner carriers. With an extensive transportation solution network, ArcBest offers superior less-than-truckload (LTL) service through ABF Freight® as well as specialized time-sensitive alternatives through Panther Premium Logistics®. These additions help elevate available logistics options for PartnerShip customers. 

    ArcBest offers a variety of stand-out services that benefit customers with specialized or unique needs. In addition to a full-service network of transportation options such as intermodal, supply chain services, international shipping, warehousing, and distribution services, ArcBest also provides premium time-critical and event shipping solutions. In addition to these options, the ArcBest company umbrella of carriers brings even more unique benefits for shippers.

    Shorter, Pup-trailer Options

    A standard 53-foot enclosed trailer, or dry van, is the most common truck type used to move freight. The height of the trailer is 8.5 to 9.5 feet. There isn't much differentiation between trucks aside from the door type, which can either swing open or roll up. This is a sizable truck, and not every pick-up or delivery location is equipped for proper vehicle maneuverability. This presents challenges for loading and unloading. ABF Freight, a premier ArcBest freight carrier, commonly utilizes shorter pup-trailers, not 53' vans. A pup-trailer measures between 26 and 29 feet in length. Due to this smaller size, congested access points such as a busy side street or challenging dock configuration, like a school, can be more easily navigated.

    Unique Freight Capabilities 

    Most common carriers are very specific about what they will move for shippers, and what they will refuse. Odd, over-sized items and easily-breakable commodities are determined risky for freight carriers, and shippers are usually refused pick-up, often at the discretion of the local terminal. Carrier Rules Tariffs are frequently being updated as capacity continues to crunch, allowing common carriers to become more selective about what types of products they choose to move. Items such as flag poles, furniture, and other challenging density-based commodities are accepted by ArcBest carriers, making them an excellent option for shippers who may have a challenging freight move.

    Terminal Direct Scheduling and Contact Info

    Another special service that ArcBest offers for shippers is terminal-direct scheduling and available contact information. If you've ever had to schedule your own pick-up, or tried to contact specific terminals to check on freight, you know that carrier websites are almost never transparent. Most often, you will need to go through an automated number and exhausting phone tree in order to access a service representative. Some carriers don't allow shippers to connect to specific terminals at all. This can be frustrating when time is compromised and your shipment is being delayed. Speaking to a particular terminal allows for better tracking, accountability, and clarification for customers. ArcBest, in particular ABF Freight, makes this a critical option for shippers.

    Expediting in Transit

    The added ability to expedite ground LTL shipments while already in transit is a service now available to PartnerShip customers through Panther Premium Logistics. Panther, an expedited carrier option under the ArcBest umbrella, is a convenient choice for customer's time-critical shipments. With a variety of truck equipment options, from sprinter vans to flatbeds, Panther offers premium logistics solutions for those who may have unique shipping requirements. If the deadline for your shipment delivery is sooner than you anticipated, Panther has the ability to bump up your service from standard ground LTL to expedited delivery while in transit.

    Added Benefits

    In addition to these distinct solutions offered by the ArcBest umbrella of carriers, there are a few other notable benefits suited for shippers who value quality and exceptional experience: 

    • The carrier network extends nationwide, providing reliable transportation that fit both regional and long-haul markets.
    • In line with providing premium shipping and handling services, ABF Freight also boasts one of the lowest LTL claims rates in the industry.
    • ABF Freight prioritizes meeting customer pick-ups, making sure your shipment gets moving when it needs to so you meet your deadlines.

    We know that every shipper has individual needs for their business and their shipping. By adding another carrier we are able to extend available service options for customers - helping to broaden our network and meet those needs. If you'd like to learn more about ArcBest shipping options, contact us and we'll help determine which solutions are right for you.

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  • How to Calculate Freight Density for Shipping

    01/11/2019 — Leah Palnik

    How to calculate freight density

    Density is a major factor in determining your freight class and your total shipment cost. In fact, many LTL carriers are relying more and more on freight density over actual weight to determine your rate. That's why it's important that you understand what freight density is and how to calculate it.

    Freight density defined
    Freight density measures how heavy a shipment is relative to the size of the shipment. The higher the density, the lower the classification and vice versa. A shipment with a high freight density weighs a lot relative to its size, such as densely packed books. A package with a low freight density weighs little relative to its size, such as a box filled with Styrofoam.

    How to calculate freight density
    Step 1. Measure the height, width, and depth of the shipment in inches. Measure to the farthest points, including skids or other packaging. On shipments with multiple pieces, repeat Step 1 for each piece.

    Step 2. Multiply the three measurements (height x width x depth). The result is the total cubic inches of the shipment. If you have multiple pieces, multiply the height x width x depth for each piece. Take the results for each piece and add them together to get the total cubic inches

    Step 3. Divide the total cubic inches by 1,728 (the number of cubic inches in a cubic foot). The result is the cubic feet of the shipment.

    Step 4. Divide the weight (in pounds) of the shipment by the total cubic feet. The result is the pounds per cubic foot, i.e., density.

    • For multiple pieces, add the weight of each piece together before dividing by the total cubic feet of the shipment.
    • Round fractions to the nearest full cubic foot number.

    Calculating freight density will also provide you with a recommended class for your shipment. The freight class chart below is an abbreviated scale you can use to help estimate the freight classification for your shipments.

    Freight Density Chart

    Helpful tools
    There are many factors that determine your freight class, aside from density, so these are estimates only. If you're looking for help to find your freight class, our team is standing by. For a quick and easy way to figure out your shipment density, check out our freight density calculator.


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  • Your Guide to the 2019 FedEx and UPS Rate Increases

    12/17/2018 — Leah Palnik

    your guide to the 2019 FedEx and UPS rate increases

    FedEx and UPS rates will be going up in 2019, and it’s more important than ever that shippers know how to mitigate the impact to their business. In November, FedEx announced that its small package rates will increase an average of 4.9% as of January 7, 2019. In December, only a few weeks before the change is set to take place on the 26th, UPS announced the same average increase.

    If you’re thinking that means you can budget your costs to go up by 4.9%, you are sorely mistaken. There is a lot to unpack with these rate increases. For starters, some services are increasing at a higher rate than others – meaning that depending on the services you commonly use, your costs could go up significantly more than the announced average.

    Other factors determine how much more you will pay for your FedEx and UPS shipments in 2019. You will need to look at the new rates based on your package characteristics, as well as how far your shipments are being sent. Here are the released rates for 2019:

    FedEx and UPS surcharges
    The announced average increase only covers the base rates. You’ll also need to consider what fees and surcharges apply to your shipments. Many of these surcharges are increasing quite a bit. Here are the announced changes:

    One surcharge to take note of is the Third-Party Billing fee. A couple years ago, UPS introduced this in response to the growing popularity of drop shipping. Right now if you use third-party billing, you will incur a charge of 2.5% of total cost. Beginning December 26, UPS will be increasing that charge to 4.5%. FedEx is leaving its Third-Party Billing charge unchanged at 2.5% for 2019. This is just one example of why it’s important to evaluate the changes that come out each year from UPS and FedEx. One small difference can have a huge impact on your costs.

    The most costly surcharges continue to be those that apply to shipments that qualify as “Unauthorized” or “Over Maximum Limits.” If you send a package with UPS that weighs more than 150 lbs., exceeds 108 inches in length, or exceeds a total of 165 inches in length and girth combined, you’ll be looking at a $850 charge on top of your base rate. That same package will incur a $675 charge if you ship it with FedEx. Either way, you’ll be paying a huge premium to ship larger, bulkier packages.

    Peak season strategies
    It’s also important to note that ahead of the 2019 general rate increase (GRI), FedEx and UPS both announced peak season surcharges. For those larger packages, the carriers applied additional surcharges during the busiest time of year. A huge difference between the two, however, was an additional charge on residential shipments. UPS applied a $0.28 peak surcharge on residential ground shipments, while FedEx decided that for the second year in a row, it wouldn’t follow suit. If you’re a retailer that delivers a large amount of customer orders over the holidays, that charge can add up fast.

    Trends in the small package industry
    If you zoom out on all of these changes from FedEx and UPS, there are a few insights to glean.

    1. FedEx and UPS tend to institute similar pricing strategies. The carriers have a habit of matching each other when announcing average increases, and when one introduces a new charge or a different way to account for something, the other tends to do the same down the road. That doesn’t mean that it doesn’t matter which carrier you use. Instead, it’s important to stay on top of the changes and evaluate your options on a regular basis so you’re always using the service that works best for your budget.
    2. Many of the changes over the years have been put in place as a result of the ecommerce boom. With more shipments coming from online orders, comes more trends that strain the carriers’ networks. For example, ecommerce has led to more residential deliveries and more deliveries of oversized packages. That’s why you’ll see the carriers making changes that help them to recoup some of the costs associated with these trends.
    3. Both carriers have been making changes throughout the year, instead of just during the GRI. For example, FedEx and UPS both increased their Additional Handling surcharges ahead of the new year – in September and July respectively. When UPS first introduced peak surcharges for residential ground shipments, that was also done outside of the annual announcement. This just highlights how important it is for shippers to stay aware throughout the year.

    We know you don’t want to comb through every tedious page of the 2019 FedEx and UPS service guides and compare them to your current rates. That’s why we did the leg work for you. In our free white paper, we break down where you’ll find the highest increases and explain some of the complicated changes you need to be aware of. If you’re looking for ways to offset the rate increases, we can also help with that. If you’re a member of one of the many associations we work with, you can get access to exclusive discounts. Contact us and we’ll find a way to help you save.

    Your Guide to the 2019 FedEx and UPS Rate Increases


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  • It's a Throwback PartnerShip Holiday!

    12/17/2018 — Jen Deming

    It's the time of year for good cheer, gift giving, and family get-togethers. One of the best parts about bringing everyone together for the holidays is flipping through old albums and boxes of family photos to relive memories from holidays gone by. We wanted to share some of our team's favorite throwback holiday photos with you, and wish everyone the happiest of holidays from our family to yours!

    Barbara with guitar
    Barbara Teleha, Graphic Designer
    Before flexing her creative muscle as the PartnerShip resident designer, Barbara was striking chords in checkered onesies and turtlenecks

    Jennifer Hammersmith
    Jennifer Hammersmith, Customer Service Manager
    'Tis the season to be "married" and bright for Jennifer and her husband, Dave!

    Jerry Spelic
    Jerry Spelic, Marketing Director
    Jerry celebrates with a themed tree every year: Meet Spencer Tree-cy

    Christine Manda
    Christine Manda, Freight Brokerage Sales Manager
    Christine and sister get festive while rocking around the Christmas Tree

    Holiday Hardmans
    Brian Hardman, Senior Account Representative and Nicole Hardman, Senior Carrier Procurement Representative
    The Hardman husband/wife team toast their first Christmas together

    Leah Palnik
    Leah Palnik, Marketing Manager
    Leah celebrates the holidays with her childhood furry friend, Figgie

    Shaunta Dennis
    Shaunta Dennis, Customer Service Representative
    Shaunta patiently awaits the arrival of her gifts - as an adult she makes sure PartnerShip customers get their packages on time

    Keith Korhely
    Keith Korhely, Senior Program Manager
    Keith's buddy Gigi thinks she's all the gift that anyone needs

    Jimmy Josh
    Josh Arnold, Programmer Analyst
    Josh offers an interesting take on Santa Claus at a past PartnerShip Christmas party

    Bill
    Bill Parhamovich, Account Representative
    Bill recites his Christmas list to Santa, it may or may not include a Red Ryder BB Gun

    Jen Deming
    Jen Deming, Marketing Associate
    Jen and brother Matt decide all they want for Christmas is EVERYTHING

    Making merry memories is one of our favorite parts of the holiday season, and we look forward to what this year will bring! Happy Holidays from our family to yours!


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  • 6 Surprising Advantages of Rail Transport Over Road Transport

    12/13/2018 — Leah Palnik

    6 surprising advantages of rail

    Road transport is a very popular mode for freight, but for certain loads, the advantages of railways are too great to ignore. If your shipment is moving over 1,000 miles and isn’t time sensitive, rail transport can be a very efficient solution for your supply chain.

    Here are some advantages of rail transport over road transport to consider:

    1. Rail transport can be cost effective. Shippers who convert long-haul freight from road to rail, can save 10-40%. Rail has lower fuel costs compared to road transport, especially when shipping a high volume of freight. Rail also has less costs associated with drivers and typically has better costs for drop trailer programs.
    2. Shipping via train is more environmentally friendly. Trains burn less fuel per ton mile than trucks. According to the Association of American Railroads (AAR), freight railroads can move one ton of freight an average of 479 miles on a single gallon of fuel. On top of that, using rail transport over road transport can lower greenhouse gas emissions by 75%.
    3. Trains are capable of hauling large loads. Trains can handle high volumes of freight. In fact, one double-stacked train can hold approximately the same amount as 280 trucks. This can be very beneficial for shippers with large loads.
    4. Railways are reliable. Railways have standardized transit schedules and don’t share their tracks with the public like trucks do with the road. For that reason, trains aren’t hindered by traffic and weather the same way trucks are.
    5. Rail freight can be efficient. For many types of loads, the average transit time is comparable to that of road transport. While rail shouldn’t be used for time-sensitive shipments, it can provide very similar transit times for longer hauls.
    6. Rail options provide you with access to capacity. OTR capacity is tight. The driver shortage, HOS restrictions, and current market demand can make it hard for shippers to find a truck when they need it without paying an arm and a leg. Since rail transport can be more efficient and doesn’t have the same kind of limitations, this is a great way for shippers to find capacity.

    Rail as part of an intermodal strategy
    Using rail transport as part of an intermodal strategy can have significant benefits. Intermodal is the use of two or more modes for transporting freight. When combining road and rail, trains are used for the long-haul portion of the shipment. Trucks are used to bring freight from the origin to the terminal and then from the terminal to the destination, which is referred to as drayage. Commodities that are typically moved via intermodal rail include electronics, clothes, machinery, plastics, and lumber.

    Limitations of rail
    While rail transport can be a great solution for many shippers, it isn’t for every load. There are some limitations to consider. First, the shipper and the consignee should be no more than 100-200 miles from a major metro area that has a terminal. Also, there aren’t guaranteed transit times, so it’s not recommended for time-sensitive loads.

    You also want to make sure that you aren’t trying to ship prohibited or restricted articles. Prohibited articles include commodities that are dangerous or could damage equipment, like carbon black, raw animal hides, and used auto parts that leak. Restricted commodities require permission ahead of time and may be constrained to certain lanes or subject to different pricing.

    In addition, it’s incredibly important that you are using the proper block and brace techniques. Intermodal containers experience a great deal of movement during transit that could cause damages. If you haven’t blocked and braced your freight by rail standards you run the risk of a denied claim.

    Is rail transport right for your freight?
    If you think intermodal transportation may be a good fit for your freight, the team at PartnerShip is ready to help. We'll find the solution that best fit your needs, so you can ship smarter. Contact us today to find out what your options are and see how much you could save.

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  • 6 Sneaky (But Avoidable) Tradeshow Logistics Costs

    12/04/2018 — Jen Deming

    Tradeshow Shipping Blog Image

    Anyone who has ever shipped to an event is probably familiar with the special level of stress and frustration involved in coordinating show shipments. Tradeshow logistics is tricky business - not only are you juggling crunched timelines leading up to  the show, but shippers also have to be aware of the many potential hidden costs involved throughout the process. Any misstep can end up costing shippers in surprise freight fees. The good news is that most of these costs are avoidable, as long as you know what to look out for. We've compiled a list of the things you need to keep an eye on to protect your special event freight spend. 

    1. The cost of shipping to advance warehouse vs. show site 

      You have the choice to ship directly to the tradeshow floor or to an advance warehouse where your show materials are held leading up to the actual show start date. There are advantages and disadvantages to both, and as an informed shipper you need to weigh what makes the most sense for you. Shipping to an advance warehouse will give you more time to be flexible should anything go wrong or be delayed. Though material handling fees may be slightly higher, it doesn't cost more to ship to the advance warehouse. An added benefit is less worry about whether your shipment will arrive on time, and you get a leg up on the shipments arriving to the show site. Your shipment materials will be ready and waiting for you at your booth space when you arrive the day of set-up. 

      Shipping directly to site can be tempting to avoid these initial material handling costs, but keep in mind that hundreds of other event shipments will be arriving at the same time as yours. If you've never seen a show-site marshaling yard, think of a rush-hour traffic jam during the last weekend of holiday shopping season. It's not pretty, and hold-ups cost lots of money in detention fees. If your shipment arrives late, the team waiting to build your booth will pass on overtime charges. If you're running extra-late, springing for expedited transportation charges will cost you even more. We've said it before, and we'll say it again: plan ahead, and build in extra time. Make your decisions based on what realistically makes the most sense for your business.

    2. Delivering or picking up your shipment in overtime

      The exact time your tradeshow shipment is loaded or unloaded is critical, and meeting your target time will save you significantly. In addition to open dates for both the advance warehouse and show site, there is a window of hours called straight time. These are the hours, and days, your shipment needs to arrive for the show in order not to be hit with overtime fees. This window is usually restricted to typical work hours, 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, for most shows, Monday through Friday. Anything that arrives after those hours, or on the weekends, will be considered overtime and incur extra charges. It is critical to check in your exhibitor packet exactly what hours and dates are safe for your shipment to arrive prior to the show.

      You also need to make sure your specific check-in time is noted on the material handling form, especially if your carrier arrives early. Often, a truck will arrive the night before, ahead of schedule. If there's no time noted, the driver may check in and get loaded on overtime, and this will increase your bill significantly. A great best practice to stick to is writing "load only during straight hours" in order to diminish the likelihood it will be loaded outside of that time, as well as act as documentation to help your case should your freight be loaded during overtime and you want to dispute the extra charge.

    3. The price of damages and how freight insurance can help

      Shipment damage or loss can occur at any time. While carriers do everything they can to keep them from happening, it's just an unfortunate part of freight shipping. With your load moving in and out of several different terminals (especially if your freight is traveling a greater distance), your shipment may encounter a renegade forklift or a heavy-handed loader. That's why it is key to package appropriately and securely. Custom crates are a great idea, especially for furniture and other fragile booth materials. Imagine arriving to a show and your seating is damaged and unusable. Sure, you have the option to rent a couch but it's going to cost you thousands for rental in addition to any repairs you will have to spring for to get things in working order for the next show.

      Because carrier liability is limited, it's always a good idea to look into additional freight insurance as a secondary option. Tradeshow shipment yards, docks, storage rooms, and show floors are all very congested places. Accidents happen, and should they happen to your show materials, at least you know your freight's full value is covered. Just keep in mind that every third-party insurance provider has different terms, so read carefully and make sure you fully understand the coverage you are getting.

    4. Using the wrong NMFC and the risk of re-class

      Did you know that materials being shipped to events have their very own class code? Don't worry, unless you are shipping to tradeshows regularly, most shippers don't either. Instead of calculating your shipment based on commodity type (furniture, signage, etc), any item either coming to or departing from a tradeshow should be rated Class 125. This can very well mean that the class is different than what you may be using on other shipments, and as a result, the price could be different than what you are used to seeing. It is important to get this quoted correctly, so if you are tempted to use a lower code because it's what you are used to, beware the risk of re-class. You don't want to receive surprise charges/fees when the carrier catches on and your shipment is rated higher than you wanted. The good news is that many booth material items such as chairs or desks tend to ship at a class higher than 125 anyway, so using a preset tradeshow-specific class code may save you. 

    5. Material handling and drayage fees

      Material handling and drayage are common fees incurred by event shippers, and often the least anticipated. This type of handling refers specifically to transportation services from your carrier's delivery vehicle, at the dock, to your booth space. These services include unloading at the dock, moving your materials, as well as storing your empty containers for the duration of the show. Once the show is over, gathering the empty containers from storage as well as transferring the freight back to the loading dock will also incur fees. A top recommendation for tradeshow shippers is to crate your loads, rather than sending loose boxes. Some show decorators charge drayage based on how the shipment is packaged. Crating is the least expensive option and also adds protection against damage and loss by keeping your materials together. 

      Completing a material handling form is crucial to setting up your outbound shipment accurately. Shippers know to have an accurate BOL prepared, but a material handling form is what the decorator looks at. The carrier name for pick-up must be noted, otherwise you will fall victim to "forced freight." This means the shipment will be sent with the decorator's carrier of choice, and that can be pricey. If it's a carrier your 3PL works with (for PartnerShip, UPSFreight or YRC Freight) an LOA can be submitted so you will be billed at your discounted pricing. If not, then you will need to pay the bill direct to the carrier. 

      The tough part about drayage fees is that these services will be performed by a specific decorator that is under contract with the show. That leaves no room for shippers to negotiate with other options the way you might with transportation to and from the event location. However, there are ways that event shippers can try to keep these costs down as low as possible, particularly regarding packaging. The biggest factors determining drayage fees are weight and piece count. Each piece may be assessed a minimum charge, so make good use of palletizing or crating those loads! They are easier to transport to and from the showroom. Go lightweight for additional savings. Heavy building materials for your booth items will quickly increase your drayage bill, so stick to lighter more transportable building options for your booth tables and seating.  

    6. Shipping there and back for separate shows

      It pays to put the time in to accurately plan how much product, booth materials, marketing collateral, giveaways, and anything else you may need. Successful event shippers create a strategy for what needs to be done before, after, and during the show. Check into any information regarding the tradeshow traffic from past years. Talk to the event coordinators and point people to gauge what you think you will need. Anticipate and plan for a little extra, but don't over do it. If you are going to be shipping to another show, look into whether it is more cost efficient to move directly to the next event rather than scheduling a return shipment back home. Very often, the storage fees at the next show location's warehouse may be cheaper than it would be to ship home then ship back out. You will have added peace of mind, again, that your shipment will arrive with enough time before the show so that you can concentrate on and prepare for the next show rather than worrying whether it will arrive on time.

    Managing tradeshow logistics can wear on the patience of even the most seasoned of shippers. Meeting deadlines and managing the details can be tough, and it can be tempting to step away and just hope everything goes smoothly. But, it pays to be diligent and well-informed, because that's the best way you can protect your bottom line from hidden tradeshow costs. If you're still feeling a little overwhelmed this tradeshow season, don't worry - the experts at PartnerShip can help. Call 800-599-2902 to speak with a tradeshow shipping specialist, or download our free white paper for more information about tradeshow shipping.

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  • The PartnerShip Carrier of the Month for October Is…

    11/16/2018 — Jerry Spelic

    PartnerShip Loves Our Carriers! Here is Our October 2018 Carrier of the Month

    The mission of PartnerShip is to help our customers ship smarter and stay competitive. The only way we can do that is to partner with great carriers and we love recognizing our awesome partners!

    Our October Carrier of the Month is Doug Davidson Trucking LLC of Salem, OH. With 27 years of trucking experience, they specialize in oversize and overweight loads and operates a fleet of 11. They are fully committed to on-time pickup and delivery with safety as their number one goal.

    The reason PartnerShip has a Carrier of the Month program is to recognize carriers that do an exceptional job helping customers ship and receive their freight. PartnerShip team members nominate carriers that provide outstanding communication, reliability, and on-time performance.

    As our October Carrier of the Month, Doug Davidson Trucking gets lunch for their team and an official framed certificate to proudly hang on their wall.

    Consider becoming a PartnerShip carrier because we try very hard to match our freight carriers’ needs with our available customer loads because we understand that your success depends on your truck being full. If you’re looking for a backhaul load or shipments to fill daily or weekly runs, let us know where your trucks are and we’ll match you with our shippers’ loads. If your wheels aren’t turning, you’re not earning.

    Become a PartnerShip Carrier


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  • Shipping a Piece of History: American Freedom Distillery

    11/12/2018 — Jen Deming

    At PartnerShip, we've pretty much seen it all. Our freight specialists have helped shippers transport everything from specialty candy to baseball jerseys, DJ equipment to used tractor engines. Every once in a while, we have the opportunity to work on a load that is unlike anything we've shipped before. September brought us something extra special - a section of steel thought to be one of the few remaining pieces left of the World Trade Center.

    American Distillery 4

    The steel beam belongs to the remarkable group of men behind American Freedom Distillery in St Petersburg, FL. They are a veteran Special Operations Unit and were the first force to engage in Afghanistan during the aftermath of 9/11. The beam was gifted to the team and they thought it best not to be held in a private collection, but rather displayed for the benefit of the public as the nation continues to heal. The steel piece is being utilized in a brand new memorial titled "Rise St Pete" honoring those affected by the events of 9/11. Located in the Warehouse Arts District near the planned American Freedom Distillery location, the groundbreaking ceremony took place this past weekend, keeping a special connection to Veterans Day. The monument will spotlight the steel beam as its main point of focus. It will also feature an interactive fountain and copper recovered during the recent Statue of Liberty renovation.

    American Distillery 5

    The retired Green Berets have set up shop in St. Pete, which serves as a close-knit hub for many of the military community including retired vets and their families. After years spent serving together in the military, they've settled down with families and are tackling civilian life. However, they often talked about a lingering need - a common goal or objective that would keep them united even after their time in the military. That dream was prompted during a group trip to Yosemite where they visited a small craft brewery. While there, the men fell hard for the science, art, and discipline of creating small-batch craft spirits. The life-long friends had found a way to stay connected through a shared purpose, a method to ease into life as civilians, and a push to live the American dream that they had so vigilantly defended.

    After several years learning techniques from experts in whiskey hot spots such as Kentucky, Tennessee, Ireland, and Scotland, American Freedom Distillery has mastered their signature spirit - Horse Soldier Wheated Bourbon Whiskey. The liquor is named after the elite group of horseback-mounted special ops teams leading the charge in Northern Afghanistan after the 9/11 tragedy. The bottle label features an image of the America's Response Monument, a memorial dedicated to the Special Forces heroes, and a special run of the whiskey will feature bottles formed in molds made of steel salvaged from the Twin Towers. The distillery and adjoining restaurant, America Neat Grill and Whiskey House, is anticipated to open early in the new year.

    At PartnerShip, we are dedicated to moving each and every shipment safely and securely. But, sometimes there are very special cases that really stand out above the rest. It's not every day that you ship a piece of history. Want to stay connected so you can keep on top of what we are working on at PartnerShip? Follow us on Facebook!

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  • 2018 Holiday Shipping Schedule

    11/09/2018 — Leah Palnik

    Holiday Shipping Schedule 2018

    There’s no way around it – shipping during the holiday season can get hectic. Whether you’re sending packages to customers or shipping out several pallets, the holidays can affect your transit times. To help you prepare for this busy time of year we’ve compiled your important need-to-know dates for some common carriers.

    Holiday schedules for LTL freight carriers
    Before you schedule your shipment, make sure to account for the days your selected carrier will be closed. Below are some common freight carriers and their holiday schedules for the 2018 season:

    • YRC Freight will be closed November 22-23, December 24-25, and December 31-January 1
    • XPO Logistics will be closed November 22-23, December 24-25, and January 1
    • Old Dominion will be closed November 22, December 24-25, and January 1; it will have limited operations on November 23 and December 31
    • New Penn will be closed November 22-23, December 24-25, and January 1; it will have limited operations on December 31
    • Pitt Ohio will be closed November 22-23, December 24-25, and January 1
    • Reddaway will be closed November 22-23, December 24-25, and January 1
    • Dayton Freight will be closed November 22-23, December 24-25, and January 1
    • R&L Carriers will be closed November 22, December 25, and January 1
    • Estes will be closed November 22-23, December 24-25, and January 1
    • Central Transport will be closed November 22, December 25-26, and January 1; it will have limited operations November 23, December 24, and December 31
    • Roadrunner will be closed November 22-23, December 24-25, and January 1
    • Clear Lane Freight Systems will be closed November 22-23 and December 24-25
    • FedEx Freight will be closed November 22-23 and December 24-25, and January 1; it will have limited operations December 31
    • Holland will be closed November 22-23 and December 24-25, and January 1
    • New England Motor Freight will be closed November 22-23 and December 24-25, and January 1
    • AAA Cooper will be closed November 22-23 and December 24-25, and January 1
    • ArcBest will be closed November 22-23, December 24-25, and January 1
    • UPS Freight will be closed November 22-23, December 24-25, and January 1

    Important dates to note for your small package shipments
    As for your small package shipments, make sure you’re aware of the peak surcharges that UPS and FedEx will be applying. UPS will be instituting an additional surcharge on residential ground shipments from November 18 through December 1 and then again December 16-22. Unlike its competitor, FedEx won’t be applying a similar peak surcharge. Both carriers, however, are charging more for larger packages or packages that necessitate additional handling. FedEx will apply these surcharges November 19-December 24, while UPS will be applying these charges November 18-December 22.

    For your FedEx small package shipments, check out the last days to ship, review important information on the money-back guarantee, and refer to the 2018 holiday schedule below.

    FedEx Holiday Schedule 2018

    PartnerShip holiday schedule
    If you need help with a last minute shipment during this busy time of year or have any questions, we're here to help. Keep in mind, PartnerShip will be closed so we can enjoy time with our families November 22-23, December 24-25, and January 1. From our families to yours – happy holidays!


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  • Just-In-Time Delivery Options You Need to Consider

    11/07/2018 — Leah Palnik

    just-in-time delivery options you need to consider

    If you have freight that can’t afford to wait, just-in-time delivery can sometimes feel like a gamble. Will the carrier deliver on time? Will my freight be safe? Will it cost me an arm and a leg? Knowing your options before the need arises can make all the difference.

    Many carriers will offer expedited or guaranteed LTL services. These vary based on transit times and delivery windows. Guaranteed services come at an additional fee and you can typically choose between morning delivery or end-of-day delivery. Expedited LTL freight services help to shave off one or two days from standard transit times. However, sometimes hot loads require even more assurances.

    For just-in-time delivery, dedicated moves by sprinter vans, cargo vans, or straight trucks can often be a smarter option. Cargo vans and sprinter vans are great for moving smaller loads for short distance trips. Straight trucks are ideal for medium sized loads and can handle longer trips. Since these vehicles vary from your traditional tractor trailer, it’s important to be aware of their capacity:

    • Cargo van capacity is typically 2,000-5,000 lbs. and up to 8 ft.
    • Sprinter van capacity is typically 3,000-5,000 lbs. and up to 12 ft.
    • Straight truck capacity is typically up to 12,500 lbs. and up to 22 ft.

    Advantages of expedited ground services
    Capacity is just one way that dedicated vans and straight trucks differ from your typical freight services. Expedited ground services have some significant advantages for just-in-time deliveries:

    • You can get time definite delivery. Pick-up and delivery times are more accurate because your load is moved on a dedicated vehicle and often served by team drivers.
    • Your freight has less risk of damage. Your freight stays on the same vehicle the entire way and doesn’t share the space with other freight.
    • Your freight moves fast. Because of their size, vans and straight trucks can be loaded faster, can move faster, and aren’t limited by the same amount of restrictions that tractor trailers are.

    Are these services right for your just-in-time freight?
    Like any freight service, just-in-time delivery options aren’t a one size fits all. There are some types of loads that are better candidates for dedicated vans than others. Here are some factors to consider:

    • Size. What are the dimensions of your freight and how much does it weigh? Since sprinter vans and cargo vans are smaller than your typical tractor trailer, you need to know if your load will fit.
    • Destination. How far does your freight need to travel? Cargo vans and sprinter vans are better suited for shorter distance trips. Are you delivering to an area that’s hard to reach? Due to their small size and few restrictions, vans have better accessibility.
    • Delivery requirements. Do you have a specific delivery window you need to meet or do you have some flexibility? Shipping in a van will give you more control since the move is dedicated.
    • Risk of damage. Are you shipping fragile cargo? If safety is a significant concern, using a dedicated van can give you peace-of-mind. There are less stops and less freight on the vehicle to worry about shifting and impacting your cargo.

    Shipments for manufacturing businesses are often good candidates for just-in-time delivery with a cargo van, a sprinter van, or a straight truck. With production efficiency being extremely important, these services can help keep an assembly line running by delivering a replacement part or new equipment exactly when they are needed. Manufacturers can also save a significant amount of money by having raw materials delivered right when they are needed instead of dealing with storage costs.

    Another situation where dedicated vans or straight trucks can solve just-in-time delivery needs is with trade show shipments. Convention centers often have specific receiving times and restrictions that can result in hefty fees if not followed. Even worse, if your exhibit materials don’t arrive in time for the show or show up damaged, it can be hard to recover. No exhibitor wants to make an investment into a trade show only to be left without their booth materials.

    Just-in-time delivery carriers and brokers
    If you think you could benefit from just-in-time delivery with a dedicated van or straight truck, you need to work with the right partners. Not all freight brokers have relationships with carriers that have cargo vans, sprinter vans, or straight trucks in their fleet. Working with a broker that can’t offer these services can limit your options – and when you have a hot load, there’s nothing worse.

    The carriers your broker works with also need to be reliable and extremely responsive. Make sure your broker has standards in place that require the carriers they work with to have a history of meeting delivery expectations.

    Overall, a quality freight broker should help you ship smarter. When you work with our team at PartnerShip, you only have to make one call for all of your freight needs. We understand the urgency of your just-in-time freight and we know how to find you the delivery options that are best suited for your needs and budget. Contact us today for a free quote.


    Not using the right service for your freight is just one thing that could be hurting your bottom line. Download our free white paper to make sure you're not making any of these common mistakes!
    The 5 Most Common Freight Shipping Mistakes


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  • Picking Your Pallet Type: How to Best to Support Your Freight

    10/25/2018 — Jen Deming

    Picking Your Pallet Blog Post

    Not all pallet types are created equal. While it's always smart to properly palletize your freight shipments, construction style and material can vary more than you'd expect. Some structures are better suited for certain types of loads. Before you can understand the best way to organize and stack your freight on a pallet, it's helpful to know the advantages and disadvantages of each type, so that you can better secure your freight and protect yourself against potential damage and loss.

    Pallet Structure Types: Stringer vs Block
    A stringer pallet is a pallet structure that uses "stringers" (2x4 or 3x4 pieces of board) sandwiched between the top and bottom decks to help support the weight of the load. Sometimes, stringer pallets are notched along the bottom deckboard to allow for partial fork lift entry on all sides. Otherwise, typical construction can limit mobility via forklift.

    A block pallet uses around 4-12 blocks of solid wood or plastic to support the weight of the shipment resting on the top deckboard. Because the pallet construction uses multiple pieces with open spaces at the bottom, there is better allowance for forklift entry on all four sides, allowing for easier lift and mobility.

    Now that we've covered the two basic pallet structures, shippers need to understand the differences in construction components  so your valuable freight doesn't get damaged. Different industries and commodities require different specifications based on the load. There are 4 primary material groups when it comes to pallet types: wood, plastic, metal, and corrugated paper. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages regarding cost, durability, availability, and sustainability.

    Wood Pallets
    Wooden or plywood pallets are the most recognizable and commonly used pallet type for a wide variety of industries.

    • Advantages: These pallets are the cheapest and also easiest to customize for a commodity's specific needs. They are typically reusable and can hold up in multiple transits. If they are damaged in transit, wooden pallets are very easy to repair.  They are easy to stack, and the used wooden materials are popular to re-purpose for mulch, paper, and other project construction.
    • Disadvantages: Wooden pallets become fragile after carrying heavier loads and are at risk to weathering, splitting, and splintering. This pallet type can be heavy and therefore more costly to ship. Wood is difficult to clean and porous, growing both bacteria and mold, so food, beverages, and chemicals aren't ideal commodities to ship using this type of pallet.

    Plastic Pallets
    Notably more expensive than wood, plastic pallets are a great all-around option for those shippers willing to shell out a bit more.

    • Advantages: While being the most lightweight of available pallet material options, plastic is still super durable and ideal for heavy loads. The material is easy to clean (safe for transport of food products) and are generally stress, heat, and weather resistant. Plastic pallets are easily recyclable and can be quickly ground down and turned into new pallets. Since they are often made of a single piece with no screws or other hardware, they can be safer to handle than standard wooden pallets.
    • Disadvantages: Plastic pallets are pretty inflexible. If they break or crack, it isn't cost efficient to fix, and they have to be melted down and remolded entirely. Because of this, and the effort that goes into making them, they are at a distinctly higher price point than some other pallet types.

    Metal Pallets
    Strong and resilient, this premium option is one the the least common pallet types, but a very sturdy alternative for certain industries.

    • Advantages: Metal (often aluminum) pallets are a great option used for transporting heavy goods because they are the sturdiest and most secure alternative. They are also excellent for businesses moving foodstuffs because of sanitation and safety. They do not break down or rot easily, and are not susceptible to warping or splintering like wood. They are less easily recyclable, but can still be melted down and reused.
    • Disadvantages: Up-front initial costs for the purchase of metal pallets is very high. While very durable, these pallets are also extremely heavy, so keep in mind the actual transportation cost may be higher as well.

    Corrugated Paper Pallets
    As the newest pallet type on the block, this environmentally friendly option is becoming more popular across a variety of industries.

    • Advantages: Corrugated paper pallets are lightweight but still strong enough for moderate shipments and typically less expensive than more commonly found wooden pallets. They are completely recyclable and transportation costs are typically lower due to their weight. Because they are intended to be "single use" by nature, they are more sanitary than wooden and plastic pallets.
    • Disadvantages: Paper pallets cannot withstand extreme weather conditions, and they are more easily damaged by forklifts and during loading/unloading. Because they are not very reusable, while they are cheap, replacement costs can get pretty high if you are shipping frequently.

    While it's pretty common knowledge that you can better protect your freight by palletizing your shipments, it may come as a surprise to many shippers that there are so many different pallet types. Advances in the construction of the basic pallet have greatly improved both durability and cost. Pallet building materials and the engineering of the structure can literally make or break your load. If you would like to learn more about how to best package and palletize your freight, download our free white paper below!

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  • Common Accessorial Fees Explained

    10/22/2018 — Leah Palnik

    Additional services required outside of the standard shipping and receiving procedures result in additional fees called “accessorial fees” to cover the extra costs incurred by the LTL carrier. These fees make up just one part of your freight costs, but can be a challenge to account for since they are often applied after the shipment has been delivered. We’ve compiled a list of common accessorial charges with a brief description of each, so you can learn how to plan for them and avoid them when possible.

    • Lift Gate Service
      When the shipping or receiving address does not have a loading dock, manual loading or unloading is necessary. A lift gate is a platform at the back of certain trucks that can raise and lower a shipment from the ground to the truck. Having this feature on trucks requires additional investment by an LTL carrier, hence the additional fee.

    • Inside Pick Up/Inside Delivery
      If the driver is required to go inside (beyond the front door or loading dock) to pick up or deliver your shipment, instead of remaining at the dock or truck, additional fees will be charged because of the additional driver time needed for this service.

    • Residential Service
      Carriers define a business zone as a location that opens and closes to the public at set times every day. If you are a business located in a residential zone (among personal homes or dwellings), or are shipping to or from a residence, the carrier may charge an additional residential fee due to complexity in navigating these non-business areas.

    • Collect On Delivery (COD)
      A shipment for which the transportation provider is responsible for collecting the sale price of the goods shipped before delivery. The additional administration required for this type of shipment necessitates an additional fee to cover the carrier's cost.

    • Oversized Freight
      Shipments containing articles greater than or equal to twelve feet in length. Since these shipments take up more floor space on the trailer, additional fees often apply.

    • Fuel Surcharge
      An extra charge imposed by the carriers due to the excessive costs for diesel gas. The charge is a percentage that is normally based upon the Diesel Fuel Index by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

    • Advance Notification
      This fee is charged when the carrier is required to notify the consignee before making a delivery.

    • Limited Access Pickup or Delivery
      This fee covers the additional costs required to make pickups or deliveries at locations with limited access such as schools, military bases, prisons, or government buildings.

    • Reweigh and Reclassification
      Since weight and freight class determine shipment base rates, carriers want to make sure the information on the BOL is accurate. If the carrier inspects a shipment and it does not match what was listed, they will charge this fee along with the difference.

    Your PartnerShip dedicated team of shipping experts is here to help you navigate the many nuances of LTL freight accessorials fees to determine which services you do or do not need and ensure the most cost effective price. Carriers generally publish a document called the "Rules Tariff 100" which provides a list of current accessorial services and fees. PartnerShip representatives are well versed in these documents and are happy to help with any questions you may have. 

    Want a more in-depth look into freight accessorial fees and how to avoid or offset the added costs? Check out our free white paper

    The Complete Guide to Freight Accessorials

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  • The Impact of Natural Disasters on Freight Shipping

    10/15/2018 — Jerry Spelic

    The Impact of Natural Disasters on Freight Shipping

    Our economy relies on the reliable transportation of goods and materials to link suppliers with manufacturers, manufacturers with retailers, and retailers with consumers. When natural disasters happen, they can negatively impact your carriers, your lanes, your supply chain, and your cost of moving freight.

    The natural disasters that have the most profound impact on the movement of freight are floods, hurricanes, blizzards, earthquakes, and ice storms. Each of these natural calamities produces dangerous road conditions that make driving hazardous, and in extreme cases, can wash away roads or make them completely impassable.

    Here are 6 ways that natural disasters can impact your freight shipping operations.

    Rates. Obviously, your freight shipping rates will increase in a natural catastrophe. If roads become impassable, alternate routes will need to be taken, increasing fuel consumption and lengthening driver on-duty time, both of which are costs that will be passed along to you. Your freight rates will also increase due to tighter capacity with demand outstripping equipment or carriers refusing to travel to areas with impending, or predicted, severe weather. If you do find a driver and / or equipment willing to take the risk, you will pay for it.

    Capacity. After a natural disaster, there is substantial competition for limited transportation resources and equipment. This limited capacity will naturally push costs up, but even if you can afford it, the capacity might be impossible to find.

    Transit time. If your regular Atlanta to New Jersey lane is two days, it may stretch to three, four, five or more if a hurricane is bearing down on the east coast. The driver may need to wait it out inland until roads are passable, until the warehouse or factory is open again for business, or may just be caught in traffic. This will increase your transit time.

    Fuel. Diesel prices always rise in the wake of a natural disaster, especially hurricanes, because refineries are frequently located near where hurricanes make landfall. This can close a refinery or damage it, making fuel more expensive. In 2017, Hurricane Harvey shut down about 17% of US oil refining capacity in Corpus Christi, Port Arthur, Lake Charles and Houston, TX. The disruption to oil refining drives up fuel prices and the fuel surcharges carriers charge you for every load.

    Refused loads. Many times carriers will refuse to pick up or deliver freight in the event of a natural disaster. If your carriers refuse your loads, your supply chain will suffer. Your plants can go idle, waiting for materials or components; your customers’ plants can go idle, waiting for you; retailers can run out of inventory; all of which result in opportunity and revenue lost.

    Inbound delays. Your flight from Dallas to Los Angeles will be delayed if the inbound flight from Chicago is late due to weather. Inbound freight can be impacted in the same way. Even though your area might not be facing weather issues or a natural catastrophe, if your inbound freight is delayed due to facility shutdowns or power outages caused by severe weather, you will be affected.

    Here are some suggestions to deal with the effects of natural disasters on your shipping:

    • Two tactics to manage unexpected increases in your freight rates are 1), accrue for contingencies in your annual freight budget and 2), shop around. Working with a broker that has access to thousands of carriers can help you move a load when your regular carriers cannot.
    • To alleviate difficulties due to a lack of capacity, think through different transportation options before disaster strikes, such as lining up backup carriers for different regions of the country or shipping lanes, and working with your existing carriers to map out alternate routes.
    • Build slack into your supply chain. Just-in-time inventory control is easier when you manage the assets moving your freight but is much more difficult to control when you are relying on carriers which can be delayed to natural disasters.
    • Leverage your freight spend. Giving more freight to fewer carriers can help you negotiate lower fuel surcharges.
    • Plan your transportation to optimize transportation modes. For example, it might be less expensive to ship your freight as multiple LTL loads rather than full truckload. Or moving everything in one truck might be the better alternative.  
    Working with a freight broker can help you mitigate the service interruptions, capacity issues and increased costs associated with natural disasters and severe weather. Contact PartnerShip at 800-599-2902 or request a quote to see how we can help you ship smarter so you can stay competitive.

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  • Here is Our September PartnerShip Carrier of the Month!

    10/12/2018 — Jerry Spelic

    PartnerShip Loves Our Carriers! Here is Our September 2018 Carrier of the Month

    The mission of PartnerShip is to help our customers ship smarter and stay competitive. The only way we can do that is to partner with great carriers and we love recognizing our awesome partners!

    Our September Carrier of the Month is Fanton Logistics of Garfield Heights, OH. They have been serving customers since 2007 and have a fleet of 23 Volvo power units and 53′ dry vans. Building trust and respect through quality customer service and on-time delivery is their main goal.

    The main goal of the PartnerShip Carrier of the Month program is to recognize carriers that do an exceptional job helping customers ship and receive their freight. PartnerShip team members nominate carriers that provide outstanding communication, reliability, and on-time performance.

    As our September 2018 Carrier of the Month, Fanton Logistics gets lunch and an official framed certificate to proudly hang on their wall.

    Consider becoming a PartnerShip carrier because we try very hard to match our freight carriers’ needs with our available customer loads because we understand that your success depends on your truck being full. If you’re looking for a backhaul load or shipments to fill daily or weekly runs, let us know where your trucks are and we’ll match you with our shippers’ loads. If your wheels aren’t turning, you’re not earning.

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  • It's Customer Service Week at PartnerShip!

    10/05/2018 — Jen Deming

    Customer Service Week 2018

    It's Customer Service Week and the time of year we like to especially celebrate our front line shipping specialists. Day in and out, these guys are making sure PartnerShip is giving the very best experience to every single customer. This year's Customer Service Week theme is "Excellence Happens Here" and it's a team value our reps demonstrate every single day. We played up the idea with a fun pirate spin for this weeks celebrations, because 'x' marks the spot for excellence at PartnerShip. And let's be honest--who doesn't love pirates?

    In an effort to celebrate our PartnerShip Customer Service team, we've asked a few of them to share a bit about what inspires them to lead every day and what they've learned since they've joined the team!

    What does a "good" customer experience mean to you?

    • Helping customers in an efficient and effective manner while maintaining a professional disposition and considering the company's bottom line. -Amanda B.

    What is the most important skill to have for a career in customer service?

    • Excellent communication. -Andrea

    What about customer service appeals to you?

    • Working with a lot of different people to help solve issues. -Vince

    What is the best way you can help put out a customer service fire?

    • Listening, being empathetic and letting the customer know you understand their concerns. Follow up with the customer. -Amanda S.

    How do you demonstrate that you are a team player?

    • Being there for my co-workers when they ask me for help. I try to offer help when I notice others may need something. -Amanda S.

    What's the best customer service experience you've given?

    • A customer was leaving a tradeshow and failed to get a quote and shipment scheduled for the move- out. The customer called in a panic because the freight was going to be forced out and they were going to have to pay a very high rate. We were able to walk the customer through completing the material handling form and scheduled/arranged an emergency pick up. The customer was very pleased with the service and thankful for the discounts. -Amanda B.

    What are you better at today than you were this time last year?

    • Everything! Every day in Customer Service I learn something new about shipping from my management team, customers, and co-workers! -Amanda B.

    PartnerShip has a passionate team of Customer Service specialists who are an indispensable resource to both customers and other members of our organization. Though this week is dedicated to recognizing all that they contribute to our business, we know that these guys go beyond expectations every single day to elevate the customer experience and help customers ship smarter. Thank you all!


    meet our staff


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  • PartnerShip Celebrates Manufacturing Day, Friday, October 5th!

    10/02/2018 — Jerry Spelic

    Manufacturing Day logo

    PartnerShip is proud to help celebrate Manufacturing Day 2018.

    MFG Day was started in 2012 to acknowledge the large role manufacturing plays in the US economy and to help inspire the next generation of engineers and manufacturers. Its main purpose is to educate and inform students, teachers, and community leaders about how important manufacturing is to their local community and their local economy. PartnerShip is proud to partner with many organizations that support and promote manufacturing, such as NTMA, MAPP, PMPA, Manufacturing Works, and many others!

    There is an increasing skilled labor shortage in the manufacturing sector, and MFG Day gives manufacturers an opportunity to open their doors and correct the misperception that manufacturing involves repetitive, unskilled tasks that happen in dark, dirty factories; it’s an opportunity to show people what modern manufacturing really looks like. Manufacturing offers high-quality jobs and career choices. Consider these statistics:

    • US manufacturing is the 9th largest economy in the world. (Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis)
    • Manufacturing supports 18.5 million jobs in the United States. (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics)
    • Manufacturing comprises nearly 12% of the GDP of the US. (Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis)
    • In 2017, the average manufacturing worker in the United States earned $84,832 annually, including pay and benefits. (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics)
    • Over the next decade, nearly 3½ million manufacturing jobs will likely be needed. (Source: Deloitte and the Manufacturing Institute
    Last year, 600,000 people attended MFG Day events, including 267,000 students.

    PartnerShip works with hundreds of manufacturers and we’re proud to spread the word about the importance of manufacturing. If you’re a manufacturer that wants to work with a shipping partner that understands your business, contact PartnerShip for a quote on your next shipment!

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  • How to Reduce Shipping Costs: Are You Sabotaging Your Freight Spend?

    09/27/2018 — Jen Deming

    How to Reduce Your Shipping Costs

    Shipping expenses are one of the top expenditures for most businesses, which comes as no surprise because it can be extremely challenging to determine how to reduce shipping costs. So far in 2018, US companies spent 6.2% more than they did year-over-year, totaling a record $1.49 trillion in shipping- related expenses. Many common shipping practices sabotage a business's ability to get ahead by protecting their bottom line. What are some important mistakes to avoid when figuring out how to reduce your shipping costs?

    It's not always what's inside that counts.

    Proper packaging is critical in helping to reduce shipping costs. We are all familiar with the risk of damages - used boxes that have holes or older labels still attached are asking for trouble. Make sure you are using the correct type of packaging materials for the product that you are moving. If you have more than a few boxes, it's a good idea to palletize all of them together, and wrap with shrink wrap. Freight shipments are loaded and unloaded at several terminal stations in route, and palletizing can keep them from being separated or lost along the way. It's also critical to use the right size packaging to help shippers reduce shipping costs. Make sure you are packaging your product with enough space inside to include proper cushioning, but not so much as to allow room for shifting or that make it difficult to handle - a carrier will charge for that too.

    You are clueless about your customer's location.

    Are you aware whether your receiver has a dock? How about a forklift? Are you delivering to a school, church, or another hard-to-reach area or location that risks being designated as "limited access" by the carrier? Will a 53' dry van be able to maneuver around that location? In addition to that, are hours of operation restricted for pick-ups or delivery? Every one of these variables can make a delivery potentially more difficult and more damaging to your bottom line due to costly accessorial charges. Keep in mind, the more difficult it is to get the delivery completed, the more you need to be prepared for additional fees. Planning ahead and knowing exactly what your carrier will charge for any additional services will help keep your shipping costs where they need to be.

    Assuming that delivery estimate is a guarantee.

    Shippers have to keep in mind that the estimated delivery day is just that - an estimate. Just as with your everyday postal service provider, business days are those included in a work week - weekends and holidays are not included. A more reliable measure to figure out shipment delivery is to take a look at transit times. When scheduling with a carrier, be sure to ask for this rather than relying on the estimated delivery date. That way, you know if your 5 day freight transit picks up on Monday, and an unexpected storm kicks up along the way, a 1 day transit delay actually results in a Monday delivery. Keep things safe by factoring in a couple extra buffer days when communicating to your customer. If you are truly in a crunch, shop the different expedited service options among different carriers, but be aware anything last minute will cost you, especially as weather worsens as we head into winter and the holiday crunch. Avoiding last minute rush shipments is always the quickest way to reduce shipping costs. 

    It's about 500lbs...ish?

    The old adage, "measure twice, cut once" isn't just a cute lesson in being diligent - it's a very important rule for shippers to live by. Guessing just doesn't work in an industry where being a few pounds or inches off can potentially double your freight bill. Carriers check weight and dimensions once, twice, and once more just for fun with calibrated scales every time your pallet is picked up by a forklift at a terminal. If the weight of your shipment doesn't add up to what's on the BOL, you can pretty much rest assured you will be billed for the difference. If you've already quoted your customer and billed them on shipping you estimated based on inaccurate measurements, you're playing a risky game. Be sure your warehouse scale is calibrated and reset often. If you don't have a large enough commercial scale at your place of business, measure each component of your load (including pallets) and add them up. Be as thorough and as accurate as possible to avoid any surprises.

    Handing the reins to your vendor.

    You may love your vendors, but lots of businesses take for granted the cost- cutting potential that's available by managing their own shipping. If you are able to do so, it pays to take a look at what carrier and service your vendor is using to deliver your freight and take control of your inbound options. Some carriers have more competitive lanes in certain regions, while others may offer additional options and less expensive fees for extra services your business may require. If you are responsible for your inbound freight costs, it's worth it to put in the time to measure which carrier and service really work best for you. The additional responsibility doesn't have to be a headache, either. By working with a quality 3PL, you can make sure you are using the correct carrier, correct service level, at the most competitive price. It's a surefire way to be sure you are reducing your shipping costs where you need to.

    Figuring out how to reduce shipping costs starts with some simple best practices. Double checking your specs, being knowledgeable about your transit and locations, and researching carrier options help keep you prepared and proactive about avoiding higher freight costs. When you are stuck or simply need some experts on your side, PartnerShip can help make sure you are setting yourself up for success. To speak with a specialist to learn more about where you can cut your shipping costs, call 800-599-2902 or email sales@PartnerShip.com.

    Learn more about common freight shipping challenges!

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  • New Excessive Length Restrictions You Can't Afford to Ignore

    09/18/2018 — Jen Deming

    New Excessive Length Restrictions You Can't Afford to Ignore

    It's a tough time for shippers and carriers alike. It's no secret that the current capacity crunch is affecting freight rates and transit times, but now shippers are facing new excessive length restrictions as well. As the number of available freight shipments continues to increase at a record-setting rate, carriers simply cannot keep up. In an effort to free up for space for available loads, XPO will be implementing new restrictions on certain types of shipments. What are the changes being made, and what else can shippers expect from freight carriers as capacity continues to tighten?

    XPO will be making a few specific changes that will affect the excessive length policies currently in place. The primary change that will affect customers is the following:

    • As of 9/24, XPO will no longer pick up shipments of pipes or bars that are not crated, regardless of length. Leading up to the 24th, all items should continue to move without problem unless over 20ft or more, which would be determined at the service center level

    To summarize, if you are shipping pipes or bars of any length, they must be crated - simply palletizing your load will earn you a missed pick-up. Some shippers like to save time by combining multiple commodity types of different classes onto one pallet and one bill of lading. If you are used to combining your multi-class shipments into one load, and it includes bars or pipes, crate them separately from the rest of your freight and create an individual BOL. XPO has created a packaging guide with notable rules of thumb to help properly package your shipments and gives further insight into excessive length articles.

    The active phasing out of excessive length shipments by XPO is anticipated to have a favorable impact on current available carrier capacity. It's a safe assumption that other carriers may follow suit. Many common carriers do not have the specific equipment needed to properly move long freight safely and efficiently. Historically, excessive length freight contributes to more damage claim submissions and creates much more wasted space than a standard dimensional shipment. This means less freight can be loaded into a truck at a time, and this can lead to an increase in missed pick-ups and longer transit times for other shippers.

    Some carriers have already adopted special charges for small package ground shipments that are considered oversized. FedEx and UPS both charge higher surcharges on these types of shipments in order to discourage shippers from moving them. These fees range anywhere from $80 up to $500 on top of regular service cost, depending on the carrier and package size. Right now, many freight carriers already have excessive length fees in place, and it's entirely possible that carriers that do continue to move oversized freight loads may implement increases or initiate the same sort of surcharge system in the near future.

    For customers who are shipping commodities that are consistently rated excessive length, it may be time to consider looking into truckload service options. Moving full truckload is a great alternative for businesses shipping many pallets of product at a time, but it's also a secure and efficient option for those who have fragile, large, or high-value freight. With this option, you pay for the cost of the space you take on a full 53' truck. Freight class doesn't affect your rate, and you may have more flexibility with packaging. Added security and quicker transit times typically are additional benefits. Depending on the length of your haul, a dedicated truck may be costly, but a freight broker can help look into partial truckload options that may better fit your budget. Whatever freight shipping option works best for you, it's a good idea to look into all available choices as the transportation industry continues to evolve.

    The capacity crunch is an ongoing challenge, and carriers are responding by changing the industry as we know it. Pricing for both freight and small package services is rising, and policies are being adjusted to make room for an increase in demand. Working with a quality freight broker can help steer you in the right direction and make sure you are shipping smarter. Contact PartnerShip at 800-599-2902 or email sales@PartnerShip.com today.


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  • The August PartnerShip Carrier of the Month

    09/14/2018 — Jerry Spelic

    PartnerShip Loves Our Carriers! Here is Our August 2018 Carrier of the Month

    PartnerShip is proud to partner with many high-quality freight carriers to help our customers ship smarter and stay competitive. We love shining the spotlight on carriers that go above and beyond and provide stellar customer service.

    Our August Carrier of the Month is A&M Group Enterprises, Inc. of Berlin, CT. They have been in business for more than 15 years and have a fleet of 30 power units and 35 trailers and strive to make deliveries as smooth and hassle-free as possible. At the same time we recognize A&M Group Enterprises, we'd again like to express our thanks to all drivers that keep our economy moving during National Truck Driver Appreciation Week.

    The PartnerShip Carrier of the Month program was created because we want to recognize carriers that do an exceptional job helping customers ship and receive freight. PartnerShip team members nominate carriers that provide outstanding communication, reliability, and on-time performance.

    For being our August 2018 Carrier of the Month, A&M Group Enterprises gets lunch and a nifty framed certificate to proudly hang on their wall. The “thank you’s” may be small but our appreciation is huge!

    Interested in becoming a PartnerShip carrier? We try very hard to match our freight carriers’ needs with our available customer loads because we understand that your success depends on your truck being full. If you’re looking for a backhaul load or shipments to fill daily or weekly runs, let us know where your trucks are and we’ll match you with our shippers’ loads. If your wheels aren’t turning, you’re not earning.

    Become a PartnerShip Carrier


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  • 5 Key Things to Know About Shipping Stone

    09/12/2018 — Jen Deming

    5 Key Things To Know About Shipping Stone

    One of the most common, and most difficult, commodities being moved either LTL or full truckload is natural stone materials. These are used mostly for construction projects, both residential and commercial. The stone can be cut, crushed, blocked, or moved upright in slabs, and each come with different requirements for packaging and handling. As dense and heavy as stone is, it can be very fragile, brittle, and difficult (not to mention dangerous) to transport. Whether you are going either LTL or full truckload for your stone shipping, there's a slew of potential complications you need to be aware of in order to ship safely and securely.

    1. Packing and Packaging

    First and foremost, proper packing and packaging materials are very important for stone shipping. In the most ideal of scenarios, smaller freight shipments can be packed in custom crates, with built-in foam material for cushioning. The crate shouldn't be too large, and should contain minimal extra space to limit movement of the product inside. Stone material can be separated in bags within the crate for easier removal and distribution upon delivery. Customized crates can be a little pricey, but it's well worth the extra cost in security. This is especially true if you are moving through an LTL carrier. In that case, your stone will likely be loaded and unloaded several times throughout the process, both initially and through terminals during transit.

    Palletizing your stone shipments is another recommended option for larger freight loads, and are often stacked with wrapping materials in between to prevent scraping. Ideally, a specialized piece of equipment should be used to transport stone shipments cut into slabs, called an A-frame. Typically, these are made of both wood and steel and include a base with A-shaped bars angling upward acting as a sturdy support for heavy slabs. They can be used for both storage and transport, and many have wheels that can be locked into place or removed. These frames can be loaded onto the truck by either forklift or crane.

    2. Trailer Types

    There are many truck types that are able to transport stone, and the equipment required depends on how the stone is packaged.a 53' dry van (enclosed trailer) with swing or roll-up doors will work well for most smaller shipments going LTL. Shipments are loaded at the rear, using a loading dock and forklift. If a loading dock is not available, some trailers have lift-gates, but this additional service does come with a fee and makes it more difficult to find available trucks. It's important to note that palletized shipments of stone are generally not recommended to go LTL, unless plenty of corner guards, foam or other packing materials are being wrapped with the product.

    There are a few additional trailer-type options for truckload stone shipping. A flatbed is an extremely popular trailer type that is widely used for its versatility. There are no sides so the deck is open, and freight is typically loaded over the sides and the rear. A step-deck or drop-deck is a variation of a flatbed that consists of both a top and bottom deck. The lower part is designed to haul freight that may be too tall to be hauled with a standard flatbed. Additional open deck options include RGN (Removable Gooseneck Trailers), stretch RGN, or low-boys. All of these options are designed to be used for exceptionally tall or long freight loads. These open types of trailers will most likely require straps, chains, or tarps to help protect the freight from wind or weather damage and will need to be requested by the shipper so that the carrier is prepared. A conestoga is a trailer that comes with a roll-up tarp system that creates sides and a top to offer protection of the freight, which is an added benefit to fragile stone shipping. Keep in mind, due to the specialized nature of these pieces of equipment, they may be more expensive and more difficult to find.

    3. Over Dimensional Concerns

    It's very common for large stone orders or building materials to be over dimensional when going full truckload. Knowing what to expect when it comes to legal requirements and how your shipment may be affected are very important in planning the haul. Every state has different legal requirements for obtaining a permit in order to transport over-sized freight. There are not only restrictions on hours of operation varying by state, but also restrictions on drivers for hours of service - meaning there is less time your shipment can be on the road. As the shipper, it's crucial to plan as much as possible beforehand and to give accurate estimates for transit time. It may be smart to plan an extra day or two when communicating with your customer. Since the load will more than likely go through checkpoints in each state it travels, each stop stop can potentially hold up your load. Make sure your drivers are prepared with the necessary permits, paperwork, and commodity information (likely including product spec sheets and packing slips).

    4. Insurance Coverage

    Due to the fragility and potential hazards and risk for damage in shipping stone, making sure you have proper insurance coverage is crucial. Carrier liability is typically limited, especially for LTL common carriers. So, if your shipment and damaged in transit, the probability that you will receive full compensation for the value of your product is very unlikely. Usually, in LTL shipments, the payout depends on a dollar per pound amount based on the class and commodity. In order to get this payout, you will need to go through all of the necessary steps to file a claim and prove the carrier is at fault for damaging your shipment. It can be a tedious process with a very limited return. Many shippers find it much more beneficial to obtain additional freight insurance to have more complete coverage of their freight.

    Truckload carriers are required by the FMCSA to meet specific primary insurance minimums. Cargo liability is the type of insurance that covers your freight while it is in transit. Typically, up to $100,000 in cargo liability is covered, but it's important to note not all types of commodities are covered. Restrictions can vary depending on insurance company, so it's always a good idea to look into purchasing additional cargo insurance to be sure your freight is covered.

    5. Accessibility of Site/ Unloading Teams

    Another huge challenge for shippers moving stone materials is accessibility of the pick up and delivery locations. Oftentimes, these loads are being picked up directly at the quarry, and it can be difficult for the driver of a 53' dry van or a flat bed to maneuver in these locations. Delivery can be at construction sites, or even residential lots, which poses even more difficulty for drivers. It's important to know that the driver of your delivery truck typically will not assist in the loading or unloading of your freight. And with thousands of pounds of hard-to-move, bulky product, you need to be prepared and have a well-trained and reliable team ready at your disposal - possibly even after hours. Most truckload carriers charge detention after 2 hours for loading/unloading, which means extra money in fees off your bottom line. The time can go quickly, so have any equipment and areas cleared that are needed for loading and unloading. Being better prepared on the front side can save you lots of money and time wasted later on.

    Stone shipping is one of the most challenging and problematic types of freight shipping out there. It's also very common. As both commercial and residential builders are more frequently using natural stone in their designs, the demand for transporting these materials is increasing exponentially. Stone shippers have to equip themselves with as much knowledge as possible about the many issues that may arise both during and before and after transit. Being well-informed is the best way to ship as smart and as  securely as possible while minimizing the potential for costly damage. Working with a freight broker can lend you some expertise from finding reliable and vetted carriers, to knowing just what type of equipment you need to get your freight to its destination safely. Contact PartnerShip for your next stone shipment!

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  • PartnerShip Salutes America’s Truck Drivers!

    09/10/2018 — Jerry Spelic

    PartnerShip Celebrates Truck Driver Appreciation Week 2018

    This is National Truck Driver Appreciation Week and PartnerShip would like to recognize the men and women who keep our economy strong by moving freight safely, reliably and efficiently.

    "From the food and medicine in our cabinets, the furniture and electronics in our living rooms, and even the cars or bikes in our driveways – none of those items would be available to us without truck drivers," said American Trucking Associations (ATA) COO and Executive Vice President of Industry Affairs, Elisabeth Barna.

    National Truck Driver Appreciation Week happens September 9 - 15 to honor all 3.5 million professional truck drivers for their hard work and commitment. PartnerShip is saying “thank you” with a Dunkin' Donuts gift card for drivers that move a full truckload for us during the week. It’s our small way of thanking drivers for helping our customers ship smarter.

    To learn more about National Truck Driver Appreciation Week and the American Trucking Associations, visit the ATA website. To become a partner carrier, contact one of our Carrier Procurement Representatives for a setup packet at carriers@PartnerShip.com or visit our Become a PartnerShip Carrier webpage. Then check the PartnerShip Load Board and get started!

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  • 4 Essential Holiday Shipping Tips for Retailers

    09/04/2018 — Jen Deming

    4 Essential Holiday Shipping Tips for Retailers

    Holiday shipping is fast approaching for retailers. Though the season of gifting and good tidings seems miles away (and most of us have probably not even begun to think about our OWN shopping lists), it's never too early to start your holiday shipping prep. You may have already brainstormed your plan of action and received some inbound items and supplies, so now's the time to make that yearly best practices list. We've compiled a few holiday shipping tips specific for retails to make sure your busy season passes smoothly.

    Tip 1: Prepare your inventory and manage your inbound shipments

    As the saying goes, you have to learn to walk before you run. The very first step in great holiday shipping preparation is getting your inventory and inbound shipments from vendors in order. Taking control of your inbound shipping is crucial to being set up for holiday success. Plan ahead by looking at your past holiday seasons' wins and opportunities, check industry trends, and do your best to forecast just how much product you may need to make it through your holiday season. If you feel you will need a replenishment order, communicate with your vendors to make sure they are clear on when you will need the product (and build in some extra time as a cushion). If you are able to, consider managing your own routings by selecting your own carrier and directing your vendors on your precise shipping expectations and needs. This control can give you better peace of mind that shipments are being handled reliably and to your specifications. An added benefit to managing your own inbound shipments from vendors is that you can price shop for the best service level and carrier that fit your budget.

    Tip 2: Invest time in planning and budgeting

    The elevated cost of shipping during holiday peak season is just a reality for shippers, but most believe it's just the price of doing business.. Budgeting and planning what you can expect to pay during the crunch can make or break your bottom line. Not only will you be spending more overall due to an increase in volume, certain carriers implement surcharges during this period, so it pays to do your research. For the second year in a row, FedEx has announced it will NOT apply a peak season surcharge on residential shipments. UPS, however, will be implementing a surcharge on those shipments from November 18 through December 1 (in line with Black Friday) and again from December 16 through December 22 (last minute rush). The surcharge ranges depending on the service, from $0.28 to $0.99 on most residential packages, which can add up as volume increases. Larger packages will also include peak surcharges by both small package carriers, with the most expensive charge costing $165 per package. Which charges apply will depend on your package dimensions and weight, so make sure to educate yourself before the holiday rush begins.

    Tip 3: Take control of setting customer expectations

    The best way to ensure your holiday shipping will run smoothly, specifically from the customer's perspective, is to let them know what they can expect even BEFORE they make a purchase. It's a good idea to take a look at how your business performed last year, check through any customer issues for common themes, and adjust where you may need to. Use your website to its full potential - utilize clear and consistent language that addresses shipping costs, delivery times, order deadlines, and return policies, and make sure they are easy to find. Update your FAQ section and any links that may be relevant to holiday shipping time tables or price breakdowns.

    In addition to your website, be sure to use email as an additional measure to touch base with your customers. Send out communications to past customers about any new policy changes BEFORE they put in this year's order. Send order confirmations, followed up by shipping confirmations. Many businesses send out notifications for delivery attempts or completions. These added touches not only communicate effectively to your customer but leave a positive impression of your company's reliability.

    Tip 4: Make your returns process easy

    As we touched on in the last tip, communication with customers is key to keeping expectations realistic and managing the consumer experience during the holiday shipping season. Another area that many retailers tend to overlook during peak holiday boom is the returns process. According to the National Retail Federation, three out of every four holiday shoppers checks the company return policy before committing to making any purchase.

    Every retailer can do their best to avoid returns by being sure each product listing is as accurate and updated as possible, in order to avoid most surprises when it arrives at your customer's door. However, despite all of your efforts, returns are going to happen. If your business is going to handle and accept online returns, the more you can automate the process, the easier it will be on both you and your customer. The majority of customers are not willing to pay premium for return shipping. Price is the most significant deciding factor, so don't waste time offering faster, more expensive return services. Providing pre-printed return labels, packaging, and instructions can all improve the customer experience, lessen the returns headache for your operations team, and increase future value for your brand.

    Summer may only just be winding down, but retailers are already thinking of what's on winter wish lists. It's never too early for holiday shipping prep, and being proactive is the best way to avoid a stressful peak season. In addition to our tips on planning, inventory, and streamlining your returns process, it's helpful to have the experts on your side. At PartnerShip, we know a thing or two about the peak season boom. We are happy to help you ship smarter, and with less stress, this holiday season, contact us today!

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  • Introducing Our PartnerPets!

    08/27/2018 — Leah Palnik

    For many of us at PartnerShip, we work hard during the day and love coming home to our furry companions in the evenings. These PartnerPets brighten up our lives and probably know us better than anyone else. If you’ve ever been curious about the people you talk to over the phone or email, here’s your chance. Get to know our team by meeting the pets who love us!

    Bailey Bear Patterson

    Bailey Bear Patterson
    Her top skill: Sitting and giving paw
    Who loves having her a part of the family: Paula Patterson, Account Representative


    Riley Shields

    Riley “Monkey” Shields
    Fun fact: He thinks he’s a person
    Who he makes laugh on a daily basis: Mandy Shields, Truckload Customer Service Representative


    Duke and Annabelle Mounts

    Duke and Annabelle Mounts
    Duke’s not-so-hidden talent: flooding the bathroom and waking everyone up at 3am
    Annabelle’s party trick: managing to be everywhere at once
    Who puts up with their shenanigans: Alayna Mounts, Account Representative


    Freya O'Hara

    Freya O’Hara
    Special ability: climbing up slides and running into things
    Who puts food in the bowl: Alecia O’Hara, Account Representative


    Onyx Samples

    Onyx Samples
    Superpower: napping and getting into things he’s not supposed to
    Who dresses him in awesome costumes: Dean Samples, Account Representative


    Yoshi and Tobias Deming

    Yoshi and Tobias Deming
    Why Yoshi’s a good boy: He finds discarded human snacks on every single daily walk
    The superior skill of Tobias: Beating his brother to the punch while playing fetch - too slow, Yosh!
    Who lets them live their best life: Jen Deming, Marketing Associate


    Gigi Korhely

    Gigi “the Gig” Korhely
    Her strengths: letting every dog have it when they walk past the house…from the comfort of the window
    Who takes her to the beauty salon on the regular: Keith Korhely, Senior Program Manager


    Mocha Magazzine

    Mocha Magazzine
    The top skill on her resume: picking her own beans in the garden
    Who she turned into a dog person: Karen Magazzine, Revenue Services Representative


    Ginger Arnold

    Ginger Arnold
    Favorite hobbies: conducting squirrel patrol watch and eating earplugs
    Who lets her hog the couch: Josh Arnold, Programmer Analyst


    Tucker, Channing, and Kiwi Laudato

    Tucker, Channing, and Kiwi Laudato
    Channing’s top skill: squirrel chasing
    Tucker’s bff: Channing, of course
    Kiwi’s amazing ability: to look like a dinosaur
    Who keeps the family together: Vince Laudato, Customer Service Representative


    Tyler Kuntz

    Tyler Kuntz
    What he does in his free time: talk (yes, talk!) to the birds that visit the feeders outside the window
    Who still feeds him even though he tries to trip him: Aaron Kuntz, Account Representative


    Andy McManamon

    Andy McManamon
    How he likes to find trouble: jumping over the fence to swim with the ducks in the neighbor’s pond
    Who lets him believe he’s a lap dog even though he’s 65lbs: Tim McManamon, Freight Brokerage Sales Manager


    Smokey Gamble

    Smokey Gamble
    How he let’s his hair down: playing catch and going for rides in the car
    Who rewards him for not making “accidents” in his cage: Justin Gamble, Senior Account Representative


    Meiko Palnik

    Meiko Palnik
    Redeeming quality: being the official bug spotter (and sometimes killer) in the house
    Who puts up with him tearing up the furniture: Leah Palnik, Marketing Manager


    Buster Brown Hardman

    Buster Brown Hardman
    Why he’s known as a Romeo: he loves snuggling, giving kisses, and sleeping in front of the fireplace
    Who hooks him up with the best tuna fish: Nicole Hardman, Senior Carrier Procurement Representative and Brian Hardman, Senior Account Representative


    Hank Bowers

    Hank Bowers
    Guilty pleasures: sniffing everything, chewing rawhides, and watching Mr. Ed
    Who makes sure he’s always ready to celebrate: Joe Bowers, Account Representative


    Zion and Marley Horst

    Zion and Marley Horst
    Most important duty: Keeping watch for the local wildlife and singing the songs of their people
    Who rescued them 7 years ago: Allison Horst, Senior Carrier Procurement Representative


    Harry Pupper Maye

    Harry Pupper Maye
    What he’s really good at: forcing you to pet and love him
    Who is more than happy to pet and love on him: Brenden Maye, Account Representative


    Charlie Rinaldi

    Charlie Rinaldi
    What makes him happy: eating everything he’s not supposed to and going for rides
    Who lets him take the wheel on the RZR: Andrya Rinaldi, Account Representative


    Canelo Villela

    Canelo Villela
    How he likes to roll: by playing with the kids and neighborhood police officers at the park
    Who loves this little escape artist: Damaris Villela, Customer Service Representative


    Jovie and Bella Hammersmith

    Jovie and Bella Hammersmith
    How Jovie likes to chill: with her friends Sammy the squirrel, Manny the chipmunk, and Hopper the rabbit
    How Bella spends her free time: by cuddling and being a love bug
    Who spoils them: Jennifer Hammersmith, Customer Service Manager


    Chunky Diamond

    Chunky Diamond
    Super skill: Destroying chew-toys
    Who thinks he’s really good at cuddling: Tyler Diamond, Account Representative


    Leroy Brown Schramm

    Leroy Brown Schramm
    Claim to fame: running up to 13 miles with his mom and stealing food off of dinner plates
    Who is happy to put a roof over his head: Laura Schramm, Office Manager


    Frankie, Bobbi, Ozzie, Cribbs, Dudley, and Jonah Centa

    The “Centa Farm” – Frankie, Bobbi, Ozzie, Cribbs, Dudley, and Jonah Centa
    Cribbs’ special skills: swatting at the dogs, drinking water from human cups, and being the namesake of the great Joshua Cribbs
    Bobbi’s (very) hidden talent: rarely being seen by anyone
    Ozzie’s favorite way to get around: in Dudley’s mouth
    Dudley’s M.O.: counter surfing for food and stealing hotdogs from children
    Jonah’s claim to fame: being the bark-o-matic 5,000 because he barks at anything and everything
    Frankie’s prize winning talent: being a prize from the county fair and being named after the great Francisco Lindor
    Who had the genius idea to name them all after Cleveland sports legends: Harry Centa, Senior Program Manager

    Looking for a rewarding career that will make your pet proud? We're hiring!
    join our team!


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  • What to Expect With Over Dimensional Freight

    08/24/2018 — Leah Palnik

    Over dimensional freight: what to expect

    When you’re preparing an over dimensional freight shipment, the number of restrictions and factors to account for can be overwhelming. One mistake can have costly consequences to your bottom line and transit times. However, knowing what to expect when you’re getting your shipment ready will help ensure everything goes smoothly.

    One of the reasons it can be challenging to set up an over dimensional shipment is that each state has different legal requirements you have to adhere to. However, there are some common categories that many states have restrictions around:

    • Travel time. Many states will restrict the hours that your carrier can be on the road when transporting an over dimensional shipment. Generally, travel is restricted to daylight hours (one hour before sunrise until one hour after sunset), which reduces your available time on the road, especially in the winter months when the days are shorter. Some states may also restrict transport during rush hour for major cities, depending on the size of your shipment. You will also need to factor in if you will be shipping close to a major holiday when travel can be restricted both the day of and the day before.
    • Escort vehicles. Depending on the states your cargo is traveling through, your carrier may be required to use escort vehicles, also known as pilot vehicles. These vehicles serve a couple different purposes. They help to warn other vehicles on the road and they can check for low hanging wires, bridges, or any other road hazard the truck may encounter. How many escort vehicles you need in the front and/or back will be determined by your shipment characteristics and the states it’s traveling through.
    • Route surveys. Safety is a major concern when shipping over dimensional freight. Route surveys are required by some states for certain oversized shipments to help ensure the safety of the load, to prevent public property damage, and protect motorists. During route surveys, a pilot vehicle will go through the exact shipment route proposed to document any potential obstructions or hazards like tight turns or low bridges.
    • Safety equipment. Depending on your shipment dimensions, flags and lights may be required on the tractor, trailer, and/or the escort vehicles. This helps with visibility for other motorists on the road. You will typically see red or orange flags and amber lights used.

    When shipping over dimensional freight you not only have to follow the state restrictions, but it’s also a requirement to obtain permits from each state your freight passes through. The permits will include information like your shipment dimensions, what you’re shipping, and the origin and destination. It will also spell out the conditions that need to be met as far as safety equipment, escort vehicles, and restricted times. It’s important to note that there are fees for the permits which vary depending on the state.

    While there is a lot that goes into planning for an over dimensional load, much of the responsibility falls on the carrier. The carrier creates the suggested route and submits it to the states to obtain the needed permits. The carrier also makes the arrangements for escort vehicles and other safety equipment.

    As the shipper, your main concern should be providing the most detailed information possible so everything with the planning process goes smoothly. When requesting a quote, first and foremost, you will need to have your dimensions. The length, width, height, and weight will all determine what kind of state requirements you will need to follow. You will also want to provide information about your commodity including the model number, the serial number, value, and description. On top of that, it’s a good idea to include information about how it will be loaded and unloaded.

    Due to the nature of over dimensional freight, you will need to get a quote at least two weeks prior to when you need the load moved. All of the pieces that contribute to moving an over dimensional load take time to secure. These restrictions also affect your transits times. You can estimate 50 miles per hour to travel, but add a cushion to account for route changes or other unforeseen issues.

    You can also expect to pay more than what you would with a typical load, with line items for permits, escorts, and an over dimensional surcharge. All of these extra steps take time and cost money, so your quote will be calculated accordingly.

    Working with a freight broker is the best way to ensure you’re receiving a competitive price for your shipment. A quality broker will know what questions to ask so that everything is done efficiently and every factor that could affect your shipment is accounted for ahead of time. Contact PartnerShip for your next over dimensional load!

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  • Ask a CTB: Your Shipping Questions Answered

    08/21/2018 — Jen Deming

    Ask a CTB As part of an ongoing effort to be the ultimate shipping resource for our customers, we've compiled the most common shipping questions and had them answered by one of our CTB freight shipping experts, me! My name is Jen Deming and I've been with PartnerShip for 3.5 years. In that time, I feel like I've pretty much seen it all. Through my own personal experience, I've worked with all kinds of shippers - from newbie to veteran. I can help answer your most pressing shipping questions and help give you a better understanding of the shipping industry.

    First up, it's back to basics: What is a CTB? And what's a 3PL, for that matter? Most importantly, should YOU be working with one? CTB stands for "Certified Transportation Broker", and is an industry certification developed by TIA (Transportation Intermediary Association) to increase the professionalism and integrity of the freight brokerage industry. Areas of study include general business principles, traffic management best practices (for shipment, claims, fleet, and international traffic management), contracts and pricing, regulatory principles, and case law.

    A freight broker is someone who assists shippers with finding qualified carriers to haul available loads, and works within a 3PL (third party logistics) organization by outsourcing shipping and logistics services. These individuals facilitate the relationships between the carrier and the shipper, and will negotiate rates with carriers, arrange the transportation, schedule pick-ups, provide follow-up on tracking, and will often offer claims assistance for loss or damage on behalf of shipper. A freight broker should serve as a shipper's strongest advocate, and is a great resource for expert shipping advice.

    There are many advantages to working with a 3PL, such as cost and time savings, additional expertise, and flexibility. A knowledgeable freight broker can custom fit shipping options based on the specific needs of your business. 

    Next up: what's the difference between parcel shipping and freight/LTL? Small package shipments are typically under 70lbs but can go up to 150lbs, and are often shipped in your own boxes or carrier supplied packing materials. The packages are shipped singularly and should not be in excess of 108 inches in length. Small package shipments are subject to dimensional weight pricing, which can get expensive, so it may make more sense to ship via a freight service.

    LTL or less-than-truckload shipping usually consists of multiple boxes or containers stacked on pallets and are over 150lbs. LTL shipments can utilize multiple modes of transportation such as rail or motor truck, and are sent with other shippers' freight to reduce cost. Depending on the length of the shipping lane, often these shipments are loaded, unloaded, and reloaded at multiple stops throughout transit. If you have multiple pallets (6 or more), need shortened transit time, or require enhanced security, it may make sense to use a truckload service instead of LTL.

    Furthermore, what's the difference between LTL and TL? TL (or FTL/Full Truckload) refers to booking a dedicated semi-truck for your shipment, that will not be hauling other cargo along with yours. This option is most economical for shippers who have a very large shipment with multiple pallets, on that requires a lot of space, a high-value and fragile shipment, or one that needs to move at a faster pace. If your business requires strict pick-up windows or appointments for delivery, it may also make sense to work with a dedicated carrier. In the past, I've worked with customers who required set arrival times for pick-up, and though they may not necessitate the ENTIRE space within a 52 ft truck, appreciated the reliability of a dedicated truckload service over an LTL common carrier. Booking a dedicated truck also gives you the option should you need specialized equipment such as a flatbed truck or refrigerated van.

    What is an NMFC/ freight class? How do I know which to use for my shipment? You'd be amazed at the variety of customer's freight shipments that I've worked with. From toy makers to hospital supply distributors, I've shipped the craziest stuff, and they all have a specific freight class or NMFC assigned to the category of shipment. The NMFC, or National Motor Freight Classification, can be rated as low as 50 and as high as 500. The higher you go, the higher the rate for your shipment. And details matter! Whether your work table is wood or plastic, assembled or broken down, each factor can affect the class of the freight. So it's important not to guess or mark whatever class you think may save you a few bucks. Freight reweighs and reclassifications are very real, and you don't want to have a $2,000 bill when you have $200 built into the budget. Your freight broker can be a good resource to determine your shipment's correct class - cutting down on costly errors in the long run.

    What are these "accessorial" charges on my bill? Can I avoid them? My own customers brought me questions about the unanticipated service charges on their freight bills more often than anything else! Accessorials are fees a carrier charges for additional services. Common examples of these include lift-gate services, residential deliveries, inside pick-up/delivery, oversized freight charges, and limited access pick-ups or delivery. The difficulty with these is that the cost of the fees varies by carrier, and while one may determine one location "limited access", a different carrier may not. Your best bet? It's smart to do your research about every service your require before you get your rate quote. Find out if the pick-up location has a dock and a forklift. Know for certain whether your customer's delivery location is a place of business or their own home. Be accurate in your measurement of your shipment's dimensions and weight. Finally, consult your freight broker for any questions you may have about what incurs charges and what doesn't - they are your best advocate!

    Just when you think you have this freight shipping thing figured out, carriers can throw you a curveball. It pays to be vigilant and ask questions of the experts so YOU can be sure you are shipping smarter and staying a step ahead. If you have any questions about your shipping practices, or how the shipping experts and PartnerShip may be able to improve your efficiency and lower your costs, email sales@PartnerShip.com or call 800-599-2902.

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  • The PartnerShip July Carrier of the Month Is… (drum roll please)

    08/17/2018 — Jerry Spelic

    PartnerShip Loves Our Carriers! Here is Our July 2018 Carrier of the Month

    PartnerShip works with high-quality freight carrier partners to help our customers ship smarter and stay competitive and we love recognizing our awesome carriers for a job well done!

    July’s Carrier of the Month is Salem Ridge Contractors LLC of Waterford, Ohio! They specialize in heavy haul and oversize loads.

    The PartnerShip Carrier of the Month program was created to recognize carriers that go above and beyond to help our customers ship and receive their freight. PartnerShip team members nominate carriers that provide outstanding communication, reliability, and on-time performance.

    For being our July 2018 Carrier of the Month, Salem Ridge Contractors gets lunch and a nifty framed certificate to proudly hang on their wall. Our gestures may be small but our appreciation is huge!

    Interested in becoming a PartnerShip carrier? We match our freight carriers’ needs with our available customer loads because we understand that your success depends on your truck being full. If you’re looking for a backhaul load or shipments to fill daily or weekly runs, let us know where your trucks are and we’ll match you with our shippers’ loads. If your wheels aren’t turning, you’re not earning.

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  • FedEx and UPS Peak Season Surcharges: The Important Differences

    08/09/2018 — Leah Palnik

    FedEx and UPS Peak Surcharges for the 2018 Holiday Season

    FedEx recently announced that for the second year in a row, it won’t be applying a peak season surcharge on residential shipments. This is good news for retailers who expect a significant amount of e-commerce orders over the 2018 holiday season.

    UPS, however, will be instituting a surcharge on residential ground shipments from November 18 through December 1 and then again from December 16 through December 22. UPS will be charging $0.28 per package for most residential shipments using ground services. For UPS air services the fees are as high as $0.99 per package.

    UPS delivered around 700 million packages during the 2017 holiday season – a huge jump compared to the rest of the year. Ordering online has become so commonplace and easy for shoppers, and the carriers are feeling the effects. The increase in volume over the holidays drove UPS to introduce this new peak surcharge for the first time last year.

    Typically UPS and FedEx have comparable rates and surcharges and will mimic each other’s changes, so this is a notable distinction between the two small package giants.

    FedEx is sending a clear message to shippers. “FedEx delivers possibilities every day for millions of small- and medium-sized businesses,” said Raj Subramaniam, executive vice president and chief marketing and communications officer at FedEx Corp. “We are demonstrating our support for these loyal customers during this critical timeframe by not adding additional residential peak surcharges, except for situations where the shipments are oversized, unauthorized or necessitate additional handling.”

    It’s important to note that both carriers are implementing charges on larger packages. With the rise of e-commerce, people are ordering items online that they would’ve exclusively purchased in-store in the past – including televisions and appliances. FedEx and UPS have made several adjustments to account for these trends, including a pushback on larger packages. Heavy and bulky packages don’t move through their automated systems and require more attention. FedEx and UPS are putting a price tag on that loss in efficiency and shippers need to stay aware.

    FedEx will apply peak surcharges for larger packages from November 19 through December 24:

    • $3.20 per package for shipments that necessitate additional handling
    • $27.50 per package for shipments that qualify as oversize
    • $150.00 per package for shipments that qualify as unauthorized

    UPS will apply peak surcharges for larger packages from November 18 through December 22:

    • $3.15 per package for shipments that necessitate additional handling
    • $26.20 per package for shipments that qualify as large
    • $165.00 per package for shipments that qualify as over maximum limits

    If you’re not careful, the surcharges can add up fast. These peak surcharges are in addition to the already existing surcharges that apply to larger packages, and any others that may apply including delivery area and residential surcharges.

    Retailers should take note of these peak season changes to ensure a profitable 2018 holiday season. If you see a significant amount of online orders over the holidays and ship with UPS, you’ll be paying an extra $0.28 per package, which will eat into your bottom line.

    To prepare, take a look at what you shipped last year around the holidays and determine a forecast for this season. From there you’ll be able to see how much more you can expect to spend during the designated peak season. You may find that switching from UPS to FedEx for the busiest time of the year will provide you with a decent cost savings. Depending on the billable weight of your shipment and the destination, the base rate could be lower with FedEx – compounding the savings during peak season. It’s worth evaluating the options, when the holiday season can make or break your year.

    There are many factors to consider when deciding how to ship your small package shipments. You need an expert on your side. ParterShip manages shipping programs for over 140 associations, providing exclusive discounts on small package shipments to their members. To find out if you qualify or to learn how you can ship smarter, contact us today.

    FedEx and UPS rates will be going up after the holiday season! Make sure you know what to expect so you can mitigate the impact to your bottom line. Our free white paper breaks down where you'll find the highest increases and explain some of the complicated changes you need to be aware of.

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  • For Good Measure: How to Avoid Freight Reweighs

    07/26/2018 — Jen Deming

    Avoiding Reweigh Fees

    LTL shipping requires plenty of diligence and double checking on behalf of the shipper. All may seem in order: you've used proper packaging, paperwork is up to date, shipping addresses reviewed, accessorial requirements checked, and you are confident you are using the proper freight class. Then it happens. Your shipment is delivered safe and sound, but when the invoice arrives, your bill is nearly $100 over what you had anticipated. On further review, you learn you've been hit with a reweigh fee by the carrier. How did this happen?

    Freight reweighs are becoming more and more frequent, especially as dimensional and density based pricing becomes more common. It's important to understand what constitutes a reweigh, and what puts your shipment at risk. Many shippers, particularly small businesses, do not have certified scales that are large enough to accurately measure a larger LTL (less-than-truckload) shipment. This means that many of the weights listed on the BOL (Bill of Lading) are approximations, and carriers are pretty vigilant at checking for inaccuracies with their own certified equipment. A freight reweigh occurs when a carrier inspects and weighs the shipment and when the actual weight and the weight listed on the BOL do not match. One of the primary factors used to determine freight cost is weight, and in many cases, affects freight class as well. Often, a carrier will charge not only for the difference in weight, but also a fee for the freight reweigh itself.

    To avoid a freight reweigh, it is so important that shippers try to avoid "guessing" their shipment weight. If your business does have a certified commercial scale, you are a step ahead of many other shippers. Be sure to have it calibrated and checked frequently to avoid miscalculations. If you do not have a scale, it is key to obtain accurate measurements and weights for ALL of the materials being shipped. This can be even more challenging if you are shipping an assembled, finished product made up of several separate pieces and different classifications. Add up materials used on product spec sheets, catalogue listings, and product invoices to get as accurate a weight as possible. It can be beneficial to look at any inbound shipping invoices for any pieces of your finished product that were shipped to you as a supply order. In short, don't be tempted to take shortcuts. It pays to take the time to measure individually and make educated and precise estimates.

    Another mistake that many shippers make that encourage freight reweighs is neglecting to include packaging/packing materials in their calculation of gross weight. An average 48x40 pallet weighs around 30-40 lbs, and if you are shipping a multi-pallet load, that extra weight adds up fast. While it's always best to avoid guessing your shipment's weight, in the case shippers aren't able to weigh their shipments on a calibrated scale, it is important to factor this figure in the total. Additional materials used to protect your shipment such as molded plastic corner reinforcements, fiberboard, wooden stabilizers, and even foam inserts can increase weight, especially if you have a larger LTL shipment.

    It's key to remember that accurate weight is not the only factor that affects your shipment- it helps to determine your freight class, as well. For heavier, denser items that fall into the lower NMFC classifications, total weight of the shipment is used to calculate at price-per-pound. For less dense shipments that take up more volume, your freight class can be higher and your shipping more expensive. If you happen to overestimate the weight of your shipment, and it falls into one of these higher freight classes, you will be charged more at the higher freight class. It is crucial for shippers to know their precise weight, freight class, and your freight density in order to estimate accurate shipping charges.

    Even if you feel you've got everything in order, freight shipping can always lead to some surprises. While it's never a good idea to cut corners or knowingly try to mislead a carrier in the hopes of saving a couple bucks, sometimes even thorough shippers can get hit with some unforeseen charges. Don't let freight reweighs be one of them. The freight experts at PartnerShip have your back and can help make sure you are shipping smarter. If you have questions about determining your freight class or how working with a 3PL can help lower your shipping costs, call 800-599-2902 or email sales@PartnerShip.com to learn more.

    5 Common Freight Mistakes CTA

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  • And the PartnerShip June Carrier of the Month Is…

    07/20/2018 — Jerry Spelic

    PartnerShip Loves Our Carriers! Here is Our June 2018 Carrier of the Month

    Without high-quality freight carrier partners, our job would be much harder, and the economy would move much slower. We love recognizing our awesome carriers for a job well done because they help us help our customers ship smarter and stay competitive.

    June’s Carrier of the Month is Boyko Trucking LLC of Richfield, Ohio! They have been in business since 2009 and specialize in LTL and full truckload shipping.

    The PartnerShip Carrier of the Month program was created to recognize carriers that go above and beyond to help our customers ship and receive their freight. PartnerShip team members nominate carriers that provide outstanding communication, reliability, and on-time performance.

    For being our June 2018 Carrier of the Month, Boyko Trucking gets lunch for the whole office and a nifty framed certificate to proudly hang on their wall. The gestures may be small but our appreciation is huge!

    Interested in becoming a PartnerShip carrier? We match our freight carriers’ needs with our available customer loads because we understand that your success depends on your truck being full. If you’re looking for a backhaul load or shipments to fill daily or weekly runs, let us know where your trucks are and we’ll match you with our shippers’ loads. If your wheels aren’t turning, you’re not earning.

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  • Keys to Success for Vendor Compliance and Inbound Shipping

    07/10/2018 — Leah Palnik

    Keys to Success for Vendor Compliance and Inbound Shipping

    For many retailers, obtaining vendor compliance and maintaining smooth inbound shipping operations may seem like a tall order. However, with the right planning and follow through, it is achievable. By following these keys to success, you’ll be on your way to reducing your freight costs, avoiding chargeback issues, and creating efficient operations.

    Developing an effective routing guide
    The very foundation of achieving vendor compliance is developing an effective routing guide. Routing guides provide shipping instructions to your vendors that help you gain control of your inbound shipments. They often include modes and carriers for specific lanes, as well as rate and service requirements.

    In order to create routings that are best for your business, you’ll need to consider several factors. Price, transit time, and reliability are all important when selecting a carrier and determining how to have your product shipped. For different services and weight breaks, you want to designate a carrier that provides you with the best rate and can deliver your product in the time you need.

    Conducting an in-depth analysis of your inbound shipments can be time-consuming but necessary when determining your routing instructions. This is where working with the right freight broker can make a huge difference. The broker you work with should provide inbound management services that help determine the routings that will be best for your business and will create the routing guide for you – saving you valuable time.

    Maintaining good relationships with your vendors
    For smooth inbound shipping, you want to have a good rapport with your vendors. Like any other relationship, communication is key. For example, when you send your routing guide out to your vendors, it’s a good idea to include a request for confirmation. However, you won’t always receive one. If that’s the case, following up and opening the lines of communication will be your best bet to ensure vendor compliance.

    If your vendors aren’t using your routing instructions after receiving your routing guide, you’ll need to follow up with a call or email. When you have a good relationship with your vendor, you’ll have the right point-of-contact and will be able to resolve the issue quickly. If not, you could have a harder time achieving vendor compliance.

    Maintaining a relationship with your vendors can be difficult and time-consuming. This is another area where working with the right freight broker can make a difference. When selecting a freight broker, ask about experience in your industry. Quality freight brokers familiar with your industry will already have an established relationship with many of your vendors, which will help with compliance efforts.

    Perfecting your order forecasting
    Managing your inventory can be challenging. But the advantages of forecasting and planning your orders ahead of time are too great to ignore. When you don’t plan ahead and then need your product within a shorter time-frame, you will have to rely on costly expedited services. Spending the time up front to make sure your orders are placed with ample time will be better than spending the extra money in the long-run.

    Also, with more lead time, you’ll be in a better position to handle any issues that arise. For example, if your shipment gets lost or damaged in transit and you need your product immediately, you’ll be out of luck. In that event, you’ll need to file a freight claim which doesn’t always guarantee compensation and is often a lengthy process.

    If you’re not able to place your orders ahead of time, it’s a good idea to consider freight insurance. Unlike relying on carrier liability coverage, you won’t have to worry about if the carrier is found liable or not and often times you’ll get paid out much faster – making it easier to resume operations as normal.

    Conducting regular reviews for improvements
    Once you do have a routing guide in place and have vendor compliance, you can’t just set it and forget it. It’s best to review your routing instructions periodically so that you’re always getting the best rates and service possible.

    You can choose to set aside a specific time each year to do a review. But if you make any changes throughout the year with your orders or any other factor that affects your shipments, you’ll want to take that time to evaluate and update if necessary.

    It’s also important to stay on top of carrier rate increases, accessorial changes, and NMFC updates. These kinds of changes can have a significant effect on your freight costs and you'll want to make sure that you fully understand how these changes will affect your specific shipments. For example, carriers announce general rate increases every year and will present an average increase. If you simply use that average to judge how your costs will be affected, your budget will most likely be off. The increases vary greatly across the board depending on a number of characteristics, so it's important to evaluate them based on your specific shipments. 

    Partnering with the right freight broker
    The keys to vendor compliance and inbound shipping management are easy to master when you work with the right freight partner. PartnerShip can help conduct a complete inbound shipping analysis, create a routing guide, and send routings on your behalf for vendor compliance. Contact us today to get started, or download our free white paper to learn more about managing your inbound shipments!

    Download the free white paper: 4 Steps to Gain Control of Your Inbound Shipping


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  • Pallet Packing Mistakes to Avoid

    06/27/2018 — Leah Palnik

    Pallet Packing: Common Mistakes to Avoid

    Pallet packing isn’t something you can take lightly. One wrong move and the whole shipment could lose strength and stability – risking damage to your freight. Rather than conducting your own experiments, check out these common pallet packing mistakes so you know what to avoid.

    Mistake #1: Choosing the wrong pallet
    Pallet packing begins at the very foundation of your shipment – the pallet itself. It may be tempting to reuse old pallets for your shipments but if you’re not looking out for structural integrity, you could be in trouble. Avoid using pallets with broken boards or protruding nail heads.

    Using an alternative material pallet can also cause some issues. Wooden pallets are the standard, but pallets made from metal, plastic, and corrugated materials have all entered the market. However, not all pallets are created equal. These pallets are good alternatives for certain specialized needs, but issues like weight, movement, and pallet strength make them not suitable for all types of freight. Before you consider swaying from wooden pallets, make sure to do your research.

    Mistake #2: Not properly packing individual boxes
    Before you can stack your pallet, you need to pack your individual boxes or cartons. Even if your boxes are secure on the pallet, the contents inside the cartons can shift. Leaving excess space and not providing proper impact protection is a common mistake that many shippers make. Start by right-sizing your boxes – leave just enough room for the product and the needed impact protection. Anything more is wasted space that you will need to fill with cushioning like paper pad or packing peanuts.

    Mistake #3: Stacking inadequately
    You may think that the way you stack your cartons is just about making it fit on your pallet. However, neglecting to follow certain best practices that increase strength can be a fatal mistake. During pallet packing, not evenly distributing weight and not placing the heaviest boxes at the bottom is a quick way to increase your risk of damage. Using pallets that are too small and thus leaving overhang is also a common mistake that will make your freight vulnerable.

    The stacking patterns you use when packing your pallet are also extremely important. One of the biggest offenders is pyramid stacking. This kind of pallet packing pattern leaves the cartons at the top at greater risk of being damaged and makes the load less secure. When possible, an aligned column pattern is best. Stacking your pallet in a way that ensures it is level and flat will put you in the best position to avoid damage.

    Mistake #4: Skimping on stretch wrap
    If you don’t currently use a stretch wrap machine, you want to make sure your manual wrapping technique is up to par. There are a couple common mistakes to look out for. First, make sure you’re wrapping around the pallet enough. You should be making at least 5 wraps around the entire shipment. Second, twisting the wrap is something that is often overlooked. You should twist the wrap every other rotation to increase the durability.

    Mistake #5: Not labeling correctly
    After you go through all that work of ensuring you’ve packed your pallet in a way that reduces its risk of damage, you don’t want to run into issues just because you neglected to label your shipment properly. One label is not enough. You want to make sure the shipping label is on each side of your pallet, with the consignee information clearly visible.

    Pallet packing may seem simple, but these missteps can create complicated issues. If you’ve discovered that you’ve made any of these common mistakes and want to learn more about packaging best practices, download our free white paper!

    The Ultimate Guide to Packaging Your Shipments


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