• Reduce Your Carbon Footprint With These Eco-Friendly Shipping Tips

    03/16/2018 — Leah Hyland

    Tips for Eco-Friendly Shipping

    With freight trucks being a top contributor to air pollution, eco-friendly shipping may seem like an oxymoron. However, there are some green shipping options that can help you reduce your carbon footprint.

    According to SmartWay, an EPA program committed to advancing supply chain sustainability, the transportation sector is responsible for over 50% of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, over 30% of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions, and over 20% of particulate matter (PM) emissions in the U.S. All of these pollutants contribute to poor air quality and put the health of people and our environment at risk.

    SmartWay also adds that by 2025, shipments of U.S. goods are predicted to grow another 23.5%, and a total of 45% by 2040. As this trend continues upward, it’s more important than ever to offset the harmful effects of transportation-related pollution and harm to the environment.

    1. Choose partners committed to eco-friendly shipping
    You have options when it comes to selecting brokers and carriers to work with. It’s imperative that if you’re interested in eco-friendly shipping, that those responsible for moving your freight make concerted efforts to reduce the environmental risks involved with that transportation.

    Before choosing to work with a broker or carrier investigate what kind of green shipping options they offer. For example, FedEx provides EarthSmart solutions, which includes initiatives like environmentally friendly packaging, fuel efficiency management, and eco-friendly vehicles. UPS has options for sustainable packaging that include reusable envelopes and an eco responsible packaging program.

    You can also look for brokers and carriers that are SmartWay certified. This EPA program helps to reduce fuel use and increase efficiency. To become a SmartWay partner, the broker or carrier need to meet strict criteria and accountability standards. SmartWay also provides performance metrics each year for increased transparency.

    2. Go green with your packaging
    Investing in eco-friendly shipping supplies is another way you can reduce your carbon footprint. For e-commerce shipments, use products that were made from recycled materials or regenerative natural resources. There are a number of companies that sell environmentally conscious supplies. For example, EcoEnclose sells packaging products that meet stringent sustainable packaging criteria. It takes into account the recycled materials a product is made of as well as the carbon footprint across the entire supply chain.

    On top of using packaging that is environmentally friendly, right-sizing your boxes is another way you can go green. Not only will it eliminate extra materials, but eliminating the extra space will help protect against dimensional (DIM) weight pricing. When you use packaging that is larger than the contents inside, you run the risk of paying to ship unused space. Not sure if DIM weight pricing would apply to your package? Check out our helpful DIM calculator.

    To right-size your packages, look into ordering boxes that are customized for your products. EcoEnclose products are fully customizable from the box style, to the size and strength, and can even add your branding. You can also use FedEx Packaging Services, which offers design assistance as well as package testing so you can be confident that your package will hold up in transit.

    For larger shipments, there are green shipping options for your pallets. You can purchase recycled pallets or use a pallet recycling program, like Millwood offers. The Millwood pallet recovery and recycling program will repair damaged pallets or completely remanufacture them. They also offer a green disposal process for pallets that are no longer useable – repurposing pallets into yard mulch, animal bedding, and more.

    3. Consolidate orders
    If you’re in the e-commerce space and you want to do your part to reduce carbon emissions and implement an eco-friendly shipping strategy, think about consolidating orders. In the age of Amazon Prime, consumers are expecting quicker and quicker delivery, which can make consolidating difficult. However, you can offer customer incentives like credits or freebies for selecting slower delivery options. If your customers are environmentally conscious, developing and marketing a “green shipping option” they can select could even be incentive enough. Also consider setting an order minimum before providing free shipping. This could cause customers to order several items at a time instead of placing separate one-off orders.

    Consolidating orders can not only reduce the amount of vehicles on the road and the resulting emissions, but it can also save you money. For example, in many cases the cost to ship three 10 lb. boxes is significantly more than the cost to ship one 30 lb. box. It’s a win-win.

    4. Make donations to offset your impact
    This is perhaps one of the most obvious ways to move towards more eco-friendly shipping. Making donations to environmental programs for your shipments is a great green shipping option, and Carbon Fund offers an interesting way to do so. Use their shipping calculator to determine the carbon footprint of your shipments, then select a carbon offset project to donate to. They offer projects in energy efficiency, reforestation, and renewable energy to choose from. There are a large variety of projects, from one that collects and destroys landfill gas, to one that reduces tailpipe emissions by providing truck drivers with heating, air conditioning, and appliance services without requiring to idle their engine.

    Overall, you can decide to take big or small steps towards a more eco-friendly shipping strategy, and every little bit helps! As a SmartWay partner, PartnerShip is committed to helping reduce the environmental impact from freight transportation. Get a free quote on your next shipment and start shipping smarter!

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  • Trade Show Shipping Tips

    01/26/2018 — Leah Hyland

    Trade Show Shipping Tips

    Trade show shipping can be nerve-racking and a bit confusing for exhibitors. Nobody knows this better than Jennifer Hammersmith, our Customer Service Manager. Her team helped exhibitors ship to 215 different trade shows last year, and she has seen it all. I asked her a few questions and she was kind enough to share some wisdom about what exhibitors can do to make everything go as smooth as possible.

    How far in advance should you get a quote for your exhibit shipment?
    One to two months out from the show is the ideal time to get a quote. Any farther out and rates may change due to fuel. But you don’t want to wait until the last minute either. Use the advanced warehouse rather than shipping directly to the show site to ensure your exhibit materials are ready to go for the show.

    What tips do you have for first time exhibitors?
    Don’t overdo it. Start small with a 10x10 booth and a modest stock of product. Your first year is a great time to learn and gather new ideas. Once you’re there, make sure to walk the show floor to look at what other exhibitors are doing and to get inspiration. Also, take plenty of notes about what worked and what didn’t. That way when you plan for the following year you’ll be ready to take it bigger.

    What is a common question you get from exhibitors?
    Exhibitors usually ask about the roles between PartnerShip, the carrier, and the decorator. As the broker, PartnerShip helps exhibitors set up their shipment. One of our customer service representatives will recommend specific days to ship your materials out, secure a discounted rate with the carrier, and help you schedule your shipment. The carrier then picks up and delivers your shipment. Once it arrives, that’s where it’s handed off to the show decorator. The decorator is responsible for the drayage and material handling, meaning they get it to your booth.

    What’s the best way exhibitors can plan around bad weather?
    The advance warehouse exists for a reason. Take advantage of it and ship early! Keep an eye on the weather – not just in your city and the show city, but also nationally. Think about what happens to airlines when one city is hit with a bad storm. Flights in and out of that city aren’t the only ones affected. Airlines will often have to delay and cancel flights across the board. Shipping is very similar. Bad weather in one area affects a carrier’s network all across the country, causing costly disruptions.

    What are some best practices exhibitors should follow?

    1. Ship early (have you noticed a trend?). It’s the best way to ensure you’re all set for the show. If there’s damage to your shipment or you experience delays due to weather, you’ll have time to create a contingency plan.
    2. Use bright, unique packaging. The best way to think about this is how you mark your luggage when flying. The more you can make your luggage stand out, the easier it is to identify it as it comes through baggage claim. A simple way to do this is to find patterned duck tape and wrap it around your container.
    3. Track and confirm delivery. When you confirm delivery with the decorator you can also have them send you a picture. That way you’re able to see if there’s any visible damage ahead of time. This extra step will save you from potential heartache when you arrive to the show.
    4. Take a picture of your freight before it leaves. If you have a picture of your freight (with a time-stamp if possible), you can easily help the carrier or decorator locate it if it’s lost. You’ll also have evidence of its prior condition if it sustains damage during transit.
    5. Create a pack list. If the shipment is lost or damaged, you’ll have all the information you need ready to go. Include a list of your products, along with the quantity and costs.
    6. Be prepared for the worst case scenario. To compare trade show shipping to flying again, think of how you might protect yourself against lost baggage by putting some essentials in your carry-on. Bring some extra product or collateral in your luggage, just in case something happens to your shipment. Also, think of all aspects of the show – not just your shipment. Have a plan for if you encounter any other disruptions like delayed/canceled flights or the wrong carpet in your booth.

    There are a lot of things that can go wrong when you’re exhibiting at a trade show, but if you follow Jennifer’s advice, you’ll be in good shape. If you have a show coming up, you can reach our customer service team by calling 800-599-2902 or emailing sales@PartnerShip.com - or simply request a quote by clicking below.

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  • Winter Weather Tips for Shipping Managers

    11/02/2017 — Leah Hyland

    winter weather tips for shipping managers

    During this time of year, shipping managers need to be on their toes to stay ahead of winter weather delays. If there’s anything we’ve learned in the past several months, it’s that Mother Nature shows no mercy. Hurricanes Maria, Irma, and Harvey hit, and delivery networks suffered. As Ned Stark famously stated, winter is coming. And with it comes all the unrelenting ice and snow that can wreak havoc on your transit times. The more prepared you are when these storms hit, the better, so we’ve put together a few tips:

    Build in extra days for time-sensitive shipments. This might seem like a no-brainer, but it can be challenging if you don’t plan ahead for it. Planning is especially important leading up to the winter months and during the holidays, so be kind to yourself and get started now. This will be essential for your supply chain if you’re shipping cross-country or to areas that are prone to winter storms.

    Work with a broker to strengthen your carrier network. With winter storms causing service issues for carriers this time of year, you may need to think about expanding your network. Working with a broker is an easy way to gain instant access to additional resources. Brokers typically work with a vast amount of carriers and have the knowledge to match you with services that would be best for your lane and delivery needs.

    Be flexible when possible. If you have some wiggle room with pickup and delivery dates, it’ll be easier to work out an economical solution with your carrier when weather delays strike. Also avoid setting up unnecessary appointment times that could restrict the driver. If the window of time is too short and the shipment gets held up due to weather, you could be delayed a whole day rather than a few hours.

    Pay attention to service alerts from your carriers. Staying on top of weather issues can be difficult. Luckily many carriers have service alert pages on their websites and some will even send you notifications when they experience weather-related closures or limited operations. Here are a few service alert pages for common carriers: 

    Shipping to a tradeshow? Prepare for the worst. If you’re shipping your exhibit materials to a tradeshow, it’s a good idea to have it sent to the advanced warehouse so you don’t have to worry about it delivering on time. Otherwise, you’re shipping direct to the show site which leaves you vulnerable to devastating delays. If you’re not able to ship to the advanced warehouse, have a contingency plan in place so if you’re stuck at the show without your booth it’s not a total loss. Determine ways you could print materials on-demand ahead of time or bring a few merchandise samples with you.

    Communicate clearly with customers. During the busiest time of year for retailers, how you deliver on customer expectations can make or break your business. Customers are ordering holiday gifts online and making sure they arrive in time is essential. Add some buffer days to your transit times and make shipping deadlines clear and visible throughout the entire ordering process.

    Budget for increased rates. Going into this winter season, truckload capacity is already tight, which has driven rates up. Drivers will also need to comply with the new ELD mandate starting December 18, which puts an additional strain on carriers. Now more than ever, you’ll need to be savvy to navigate the season.

    Being proactive is the first step towards smooth shipping in the winter months. Planning for the inevitable bad weather will help you to not miss a beat when you encounter a service disruption. When you work with PartnerShip, our shipping experts can find solutions that are right for you. Get a free analysis today!

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  • 5 "Scary" Shipping Mistakes

    10/26/2017 — Jen Deming

    5 Scary Shipping Mistakes

    Halloween season is here! As pumpkins are being carved and candy bowls set out, it’s also just the right time to discuss some scary mistakes made by shippers. Let’s take a look at the top 5 errors commonly made in freight shipping, so we can be sure your fall business is full of treats, not tricks!

    Mistake #1: Improperly Packaging Your Shipment
    The first mistake freight shippers make happens even before a pick-up is scheduled and the load is in transit! Packaging your product critically protects from damages both during the move and unloading at multiple terminals. Whether you are shipping in boxes or on a pallet, it’s important that both are sized just right, and in solid condition. In fact, a box can lose up to 50% of its structural integrity after a single shipment. Too much space can allow your product to shift, which can increase opportunity for damage. Use proper cushioning and foam inserts, as well as exterior wrapping especially if you have multiple pieces. Be smart, try to group multiple units into a single load so they do not get separated during the move.

    Mistake #2: Bill of Lading (BOL) Errors
    Another scary shipping mistake concerns paperwork errors. These include details such as entered weight, freight class, and shipping addresses provided on the BOL. All three are elements that help determine a freight rate for your shipment. Any errors made on these factors will most likely cause a discrepancy and an increase in rate due to re-weigh fees, adjusted classes, and re-delivery charges if an address is invalid or incorrect. Holding a shipment at a terminal for any length of time while determining the appropriate address can incur holding fees as well. Often, shippers will intentionally use a lower class than what is accurate for their shipment, hoping to slide by inspection. If flagged, the shipment will be billed at the higher actual class, and the shipper will be responsible for the difference. Guessing approximations for weight is risky too, because if the discrepancy is caught, the shipper will pay a re-weigh fee and the difference in weight. Having accurate details on your shipping paperwork is key in avoiding unplanned shipping costs.

    Mistake #3: Forgoing Additional Insurance Coverage 
    A third scary shipping mistake refers to insurance and liability. This becomes extremely important in the unfortunate case that your shipment should become lost or damaged. Each carrier offers limited liability on freight shipments, with the amount of coverage set at a fixed dollar amount per pound of freight determined by carrier and commodity. It is the responsibility of the shipper to prove that the shipment was in good condition and packaged correctly at pick-up. The carrier will then attempt to prove that it was not negligent or responsible for the damages incurred in transit. The final approval or denial of the claim can take some time, and you cannot always count on getting damages paid out, no matter how thorough you are. Your best line of defense is looking into supplementary insurance. Freight insurance acquired on your own or through your shipping partner provides more protection than relying on the carrier alone. Even if you do win a claim and get paid out by the carrier, liability may be limited, and you may not get the full amount of your claim. Purchasing additional insurance can help, and it’s important to understand your policy before you ship. PartnerShip understands you need peace of mind, and we offer supplementary freight insurance at a minimal additional cost as an option on all freight quotes.

    Mistake #4: Choosing the Incorrect Service/Accessorials
    Most carriers offer different time-sensitive service levels depending on the urgency of your freight shipment. Expedited, guaranteed, time-critical, and truckload are a few. Guaranteed services help you stick to a delivery schedule with a specified on-time delivery, by either 12 PM or 5 PM. Expedited and Time-Critical services offer faster transit times and a more urgent delivery. All of these services tend to be costly, so it is important to determine what your transit time needs are, well in advance. Delivery schedules can be delayed due to inclement weather, missed pick-ups, and a heavier shipping season. Building extra time into a delivery deadline can help avoid unnecessary expedited costs that add up, especially as we head into the holidays.

    Another common error that shippers make is neglecting to add-in the cost of additional services, or accessorials, when they get their freight quotes. Be mindful of what is needed at the shipment's origin or destination. Does the shipper need a lift-gate at pick up? Do they have a dock? Is it being delivered to a residential location, or at a school or construction site? Chances are, there's a fee for that. It's important to learn everything you can about pick-up and delivery services that may be required, and inform your carrier or service provider before you get a rate for your freight.

    Mistake #5: Leaving Inbound Shipping to Vendors
    A final, costly error that many shippers make is leaving inbound shipping decisions completely up to their vendors. Commonly, businesses may allow the vendor shipping your order to arrange with their own carrier choice, marking the freight charges as "Prepaid," and then including those charges in your invoice. Taking control of your inbound shipping is one of the easiest ways to cut your shipping expenses, and working with a 3PL such as PartnerShip is one way to make sure you are saving on your inbound freight.

    At PartnerShip, we can provide an inbound shipping analysis by looking at what you pay and whether we can save money on your shipping costs. Our team can contact your vendors on your behalf, create updated routing requests, and inform them of your specific shipping instructions. We offer consolidated invoicing and audit all of your inbound freight bills for accuracy. Think you might be able to save on your outbound shipment? We've got your back on those, too.

    Keeping your shipping costs low and your freight safe may seem intimidating, but it doesn't have to be scary. When you work with PartnerShip, our shipping experts will double check shipment details, compare your pricing, and make sure you are covered from pick-up to delivery. Take your freight shipping from spooky to stress-free and contact us for a free shipping analysis!

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  • 3 Useful Tips to Help Reduce Your Freight Claims

    07/28/2017 — Jen Deming

    “Damage” and “Claims” are four letter words in the world of freight shipping, and can be a real headache to logistics managers and coordinators alike. On both the outbound and receiving end, there are several ways you can reduce these risks and help keep freight damage to a minimum.

    Proper packaging for your freight shipment is key, whether you are shipping boxed items or palletized loads, and one of the most avoidable mistakes contributing to damage claims is insufficient preparation and packaging.  These materials cost typically less than an approximated 10% of overall shipping expenditures, so it doesn’t pay to cut corners in the short run when you are essentially increasing your risk overall. Containers and boxes should be in good, solid condition and sized to allow for just enough room to provide proper cushioning around your product. Use foam sheets, bubble wrapping, and cardboard inserts within the container, and wrap each item separately to maximize security.

    To avoid freight damage, palletized shipments need to be secure as well, with items stacked uniformly and evenly distributed. Try to avoid product overhang on the edge of the pallets and anchor stacked boxes or multiple products into place with shrink wrap, plastic banding, or a breakaway adhesive. Being thorough and adhering to these standards can help limit the risk of damage.

    Labeling and Paperwork
    Precise shipment labeling also helps limit freight claims and losses by listing correct contact details, product descriptions, and ensuring accurate transit and delivery. To be sure that these instructions are clear, remove or completely cover old labels. Place the label on the top of the container or make it clearly visible on the side of each individual pallet, and include the total pallet count. For added safety, place a copy of the address label inside the container should the original be removed during transit.

    A properly completed Bill of Lading (BOL) must be included with your shipment and serves three essential functions: a receipt for the goods being shipped, a document of titles, and evidence as the contract between the carrier and the shipper. Be sure to precisely class your shipment, include product description and item count, as well as list your billing party. If the event that you do receive damaged boxes and product, it is important to inspect and note details of the freight damage on the delivery receipt before signing for receipt of your freight. All of these details are essential should your shipment encounter any bumps in the road and you do need to file a freight claim with a carrier.

    Choose the Correct Service
    Knowing which particular type of freight shipping service best suits your shipment type can also help reduce damage and claims. Keep in mind, that standard Less-Than-Truckload shipments are loaded and unloaded several times at various carrier terminals as they make their way from your origin to its final destination. With each additional stop, your risk for freight damage increases. If the security of your shipment is a special concern, it may be worthwhile to consider moving your larger, multiple pallet loads with a dedicated or partially dedicated truckload service. With no extra stops, your freight does not need to be moved on and off the truck and remains significantly more secure with a quicker transit time, speeding up the delivery of your product.

    These suggestions are just a few ways you can be vigilant about protecting your freight shipments against damage and claims. While there’s no sure fire way to avoid these occurrences completely, PartnerShip can help you measure your shipping options and determine the best ways to help protect your freight. Contact us at 800-599-2902 or get a quote now!

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  • Five Important Reasons You Should be Using a Freight Broker

    04/11/2017 — Jerry Spelic

    It is a very common question for shippers: "Should I use a freight broker?" Before we list five important reasons why you should use a freight broker, we answer the question, “What is a freight broker?” A broker arranges freight shipping between a carrier and a shipper. In exchange, the broker receives a small commission for facilitating the transaction. That’s how freight brokers make money.

    So, why use a freight broker? Efficiency. A freight broker adds value and flexibility to your supply chain and that becomes your competitive advantage. Focusing all of your energy on what you do best gives you an edge and helps you stay competitive.  Unless what you do best is shipping, you should consider using a freight broker to manage your shipping and logistics functions.

    Big companies got big because they focused on what they did best. In fact, 85% of Fortune 500 companies use third-party logistics providers like freight brokers. That’s not a coincidence; it’s a cause-and-effect relationship. Every dollar saved on shipping goes right to the bottom line.

    Consider these five important advantages of using a freight broker:

    Save time, save resources, save money. With a freight broker as a strategic partner, you have the benefit of your own dedicated shipping department without the expense your own dedicated shipping department. You also don’t need to spend time on invoices, audits and training, Using a freight broker lets you focus on your business.

    We could end the list right here. But wait, there are more benefits of using a freight broker!

    More flexibility, more scalability. A freight broker partner is able to provide you more, or less, capacity as your business goes through its natural cycles. So there’s no need to stress over seasonality, irregular spikes or sudden troughs in your business.

    Shipping expertise. What freight brokers do best is shipping, and working with one allows you access to their knowledge of best practices and real-world experience. It also allows you to access the latest technology for shipping reporting and visibility into your logistics.

    It’s not just what you know, it’s who you know. Freight broker partners have expansive carrier networks that provide many advantages over an in-house shipping department. They have buying power and can provide volume discounts, lowering your shipping expenses. They also can provide access to capacity that otherwise would be unavailable, or very costly, to an internal shipping department.

    It’s a partnership. Your freight broker works for you and will put your interests first, because when you succeed, they succeed and when your business grows, so does theirs. That’s the definition of a partnership: benefits for both parties.

    Need more convincing about the benefits of using a freight broker? Call PartnerShip at 800-599-2902 or contact us and see how we can help you ship smarter so you can stay competitive. You might also want to subscribe to our freight broker blog, The PartnerShip Connection, to learn more about how to use freight brokers. Just type your email address in the box in the upper right part of this page and hit "subscribe!"

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  • Tradeshow Shipping: Advance Warehouse or Show Site?

    05/26/2016 — Jerry Spelic

    It’s a questions we get asked a lot: “Should I ship to the advance warehouse or direct to the tradeshow site?” The answer really depends on your tradeshow schedule and / or the size of your booth.

    When you exhibit at a tradeshow, you have to ship your booth, booth furnishings, marketing collateral and handouts, and product to the show site in order to have a successful show. Your shipping choices are to ship direct to the tradeshow floor to arrive when your booth staff does, or you can ship days or even weeks earlier to the advance warehouse. Here are the advantages and disadvantages of both options.

    Shipping Direct to Show Site - Advantages

    • You can wait until the last minute to get everything ready to ship, such as booth graphics, product prototypes or mock-ups, and marketing collateral
    • Your material handling charges will be a bit lower**
    • You can ship small packages directly to the show floor

    Shipping Direct to Show Site - Disadvantages

    • Your shipment may be one of hundreds arriving at the same time, so even though it may arrive early in the day, it might not reach your booth until much later
    • The I & D (Install and Dismantle) team waiting to build your booth may have to wait for your shipment, causing you to incur overtime charges
    •  If your shipment arrives earlier or later than your move-in time, you will incur additional charges
    •  If you have a targeted move-in time assigned by the show, you may have to pay higher shipping charges for guaranteed delivery during your assigned move-in window
    • You may have to pay overtime charges, especially if your shipment has to arrive on a weekend or after hours

    Advance Warehouse - Advantages

    • Each show has a dedicated warehouse for delivery and storage of all shipments. Your materials are kept dry and secure until show time
    • On the first day of move-in your freight will be waiting for you at your booth
    • You can confirm your shipment has arrived and that everything is intact. In the event damage does occur, you have time to react and adapt
    • The weather! Tradeshows often take place in months when severe weather can delay your shipment
    • Your shipment can typically arrive up to 30 days prior to move-in, meaning delivery dates and times are more flexible so you can lower your shipping costs by using a non-priority service

    Advance Warehouse - Disadvantages

    • If your freight arrives after the deadline, it will still be received, but additional charges will apply
    • The warehouse will only accept crates‚ palletized items, trunks/cases and carpets. Loose or small packages must be sent directly to the show site
    • Slightly higher drayage (material handling) fees**

    ** A word about material handling / drayage fees: Material handling fees are charges based on various operational activities, such as storage of your freight, labor and equipment to unload inbound shipments, delivery to your booth, delivery of empty containers to and from storage, and moving materials from your booth to the outbound carrier. Material handling fees are unavoidable; you pay them whether you ship to the advance warehouse or the show site. Typically, advance warehouse material handling fees are only about 10% higher than show site material handling fees.

    Our suggestion: if you are not constrained by a tradeshow schedule that forces you to ship your booth from one show to the next, the advance warehouse is your best shipping option. It might be a bit more expensive, but the time, stress and anxiety savings will more than make up for it.

    If you have a small tabletop or pop-up booth that can be assembled quickly with no help needed, and you are not anticipating any potential weather delays, shipping direct to the show site is an acceptable option.

    We’ve helped thousands of companies ship their tradeshow materials and we’ve accumulated a great deal of knowledge, tips, and tricks to make your tradeshow experience a smooth one. Email us at sales@PartnerShip.com for more information or with any tradeshow question! 

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  • Truckload Shipping 101

    03/09/2016 — Matt Nagel