• Everything You Need to Know About Freight Claims

    08/25/2017 — Leah Hyland

    filing freight claims for damaged freightDamaged freight is every shipper’s worst nightmare. To make it worse, filing freight claims is a complex and frustrating process. There is a lot you need to know about what to document, what to file, and what the Carmack Amendment covers. Before you find yourself in this mess, it’s best to learn some of the basics.

    First, damaged freight isn’t the only type of freight claim you may encounter. You may also experience a shortage or a lost shipment all together. And then there’s the concealed claims – when the cargo damage or shortage is discovered after delivery and reported after the driver leaves. As you can imagine, there can be extra hoops to jump through in these situations.

    Before you can understand what to do in the case you need to file a cargo claim, you need to understand the Carmack Amendment. This law addresses the issue of liability between shippers and carriers. Under this law, you have to establish that the goods in question were picked up in good condition, delivered in damaged condition, and resulted in a specific amount of damage.

    Once you’re able to prove that these requirements were met, the carrier is held liable unless it proves that it was not negligent and the cause of cargo damage was one of the following: 

    • Act of God 
    • Public enemy
    • Act of default of shipper 
    • Public authority 
    • The inherent vice or nature of the goods

    If you have to file a claim, it’s best to do it as soon as possible. You typically will have 9 months from the delivery date, or only 5 days in the case of a concealed claim. You’ll want to have the Proof of Delivery (POD), the original Bill of Lading (BOL), freight bill, merchandise invoice, and replacement invoice or repair bill to support your claim. Taking pictures to include is also very helpful.

    Unfortunately there are several issues that could cause your cargo claim to be denied. If you want to secure a fair resolution, make sure your documentation is accurate, your claim includes specific details, and you have proof that you attempted to mitigate the damage.

    The subject of freight claims is complicated, but that doesn’t mean you’re out of luck. PartnerShip has developed a helpful white paper that details everything you need to know about filing a freight claim. It also provides you with important information that will teach you how to package your shipments to avoid damaged freight, how to set procedures for accepting freight that protects you in the event you need to file a claim, and how to ensure your claim doesn’t get denied.

    Download the free white paper: Everything You Need to Know About Freight Claims!

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  • 3 Useful Tips to Help Reduce Your Freight Claims

    07/28/2017 — Jen Deming

    “Damage” and “Claims” are four letter words in the world of freight shipping, and can be a real headache to logistics managers and coordinators alike. On both the outbound and receiving end, there are several ways you can reduce these risks and help keep freight damage to a minimum.

    Proper packaging for your freight shipment is key, whether you are shipping boxed items or palletized loads, and one of the most avoidable mistakes contributing to damage claims is insufficient preparation and packaging.  These materials cost typically less than an approximated 10% of overall shipping expenditures, so it doesn’t pay to cut corners in the short run when you are essentially increasing your risk overall. Containers and boxes should be in good, solid condition and sized to allow for just enough room to provide proper cushioning around your product. Use foam sheets, bubble wrapping, and cardboard inserts within the container, and wrap each item separately to maximize security.

    To avoid freight damage, palletized shipments need to be secure as well, with items stacked uniformly and evenly distributed. Try to avoid product overhang on the edge of the pallets and anchor stacked boxes or multiple products into place with shrink wrap, plastic banding, or a breakaway adhesive. Being thorough and adhering to these standards can help limit the risk of damage.

    Labeling and Paperwork
    Precise shipment labeling also helps limit freight claims and losses by listing correct contact details, product descriptions, and ensuring accurate transit and delivery. To be sure that these instructions are clear, remove or completely cover old labels. Place the label on the top of the container or make it clearly visible on the side of each individual pallet, and include the total pallet count. For added safety, place a copy of the address label inside the container should the original be removed during transit.

    A properly completed Bill of Lading (BOL) must be included with your shipment and serves three essential functions: a receipt for the goods being shipped, a document of titles, and evidence as the contract between the carrier and the shipper. Be sure to precisely class your shipment, include product description and item count, as well as list your billing party. If the event that you do receive damaged boxes and product, it is important to inspect and note details of the freight damage on the delivery receipt before signing for receipt of your freight. All of these details are essential should your shipment encounter any bumps in the road and you do need to file a freight claim with a carrier.

    Choose the Correct Service
    Knowing which particular type of freight shipping service best suits your shipment type can also help reduce damage and claims. Keep in mind, that standard Less-Than-Truckload shipments are loaded and unloaded several times at various carrier terminals as they make their way from your origin to its final destination. With each additional stop, your risk for freight damage increases. If the security of your shipment is a special concern, it may be worthwhile to consider moving your larger, multiple pallet loads with a dedicated or partially dedicated truckload service. With no extra stops, your freight does not need to be moved on and off the truck and remains significantly more secure with a quicker transit time, speeding up the delivery of your product.

    These suggestions are just a few ways you can be vigilant about protecting your freight shipments against damage and claims. While there’s no sure fire way to avoid these occurrences completely, PartnerShip can help you measure your shipping options and determine the best ways to help protect your freight. Contact us at 800-599-2902 or get a quote now!

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